Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

it seems this only work on "even" numbers:

"8"|0 + 1   // 9
"3"|0 + 1   // 3
("3"|0) + 1 // 4

but "3"|0 translates to the Integer 3.

so what's going on here?
why does the second example acts like this in JS?

share|improve this question
2  
    
@Oded: apparently I was reading developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/operators/… instead of just going to the page you mentioned. sweet! 10x – vsync Jun 12 '11 at 20:19
up vote 8 down vote accepted

The precedence of + is higher than |.

So it's parsing like this:

"8" | (0 + 1) = "8" | 1 = 9
"3" | (0 + 1) = "3" | 1 = 3
share|improve this answer
    
nice! didn't even thought the precedence has changed – vsync Jun 12 '11 at 20:17
    
+ has been higher than | since time immemorial --- well, C at least: (see difranco.net/cop2220/op-prec.htm) What language were you thinking of? – David Given Jun 12 '11 at 22:29
    
I know only JS. and my Math sucks, so as far as I know + and - are the lowest in the rank of precedence... – vsync Jun 13 '11 at 8:08

+ has higher precedence than | so you need to put the brackets in to get the order of evaluation that you want.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.