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Is there a function that adds a curve that fits the peaks if given two vectors and their plot? For example, I have:

x= c(0:20)

x [1] 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

y [1] 19.4 17.9 8.1 11.3 7.8 8.0 5.0 1.7 3.9 5.4 7.5 5.4 4.7 5.0 4.9 3.5 2.9 2.4 1.4 1.7

plot(x,y,xlim=range(x),ylim=range(y))

best, Nanami

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Can you clarify what you mean by 'fits the peaks'? –  Nick Sabbe Jun 12 '11 at 20:18
    
I mean a curve that follows the trend of the values, but doesn't take into consideration every value. I've tried doing this with loess - but with that I obtain a curve that fits the whole date and I want to take into consideration the highest and the lowest value. –  Nanami Jun 12 '11 at 20:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Mathematically speaking, your problem is very poorly defined. You supply a range of discrete values, not a function, for your y values. This means it can not be differentiated to find local maxima.

That said, here is a bit of code that might get you started. It makes use of a function called peaks, (attributed to Brian Ripley):

peaks<-function(series,span=3){
  z <- embed(series, span)
  s <- span%/%2
  v<- max.col(z) == 1 + s
  result <- c(rep(FALSE,s),v)
  result <- result[1:(length(result)-s)]
  result
} 

x <- c(1:20)
y <- c(19.4, 17.9, 8.1, 11.3, 7.8, 8.0, 5.0, 1.7, 3.9, 
       5.4, 7.5, 5.4, 4.7, 5.0, 4.9, 3.5, 2.9, 2.4, 1.4, 1.7)

plot(x,y, type="l")
p <- which(peaks(y, span=3))

lines(x[p], y[p], col="red", type="b)

enter image description here

The problem is that the concept of local peaks is poorly defined. How local do you mean? The peaks algorithm as supplied allows you to modify the span. Have a play and see whether it is helpful at all.

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so, it would be better to use directly the function that I am given to compute the y values? For example if have: y<-v(i)*100/sum(v) where v is an input vector how should I handle this? –  Nanami Jun 12 '11 at 20:48
    
Unless v is a continuous function you will still have the same problem. –  Andrie Jun 13 '11 at 6:30

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