Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'd like to take an HTML table and parse through it to get a list of dictionaries. Each list element would be a dictionary corresponding to a row in the table.

If, for example, I had an HTML table with three columns (marked by header tags), "Event", "Start Date", and "End Date" and that table had 5 entries, I would like to parse through that table to get back a list of length 5 where each element is a dictionary with keys "Event", "Start Date", and "End Date".

Thanks for the help!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 35 down vote accepted

You should use some HTML parsing library like lxml:

from lxml import etree
s = """<table>
  <tr><th>Event</th><th>Start Date</th><th>End Date</th></tr>
  <tr><td>a</td><td>b</td><td>c</td></tr>
  <tr><td>d</td><td>e</td><td>f</td></tr>
  <tr><td>g</td><td>h</td><td>i</td></tr>
</table>
"""
table = etree.XML(s)
rows = iter(table)
headers = [col.text for col in next(rows)]
for row in rows:
    values = [col.text for col in row]
    print dict(zip(headers, values))

prints

{'End Date': 'c', 'Start Date': 'b', 'Event': 'a'}
{'End Date': 'f', 'Start Date': 'e', 'Event': 'd'}
{'End Date': 'i', 'Start Date': 'h', 'Event': 'g'}
share|improve this answer
    
My table has a varying number of rows. How can I make it work if this is the case? Thanks for the response, btw. –  Andrew Jun 12 '11 at 23:09
    
@Andrew: The above code works for any number of rows and any number of columns, as long as every row has the same number of columns. –  Sven Marnach Jun 12 '11 at 23:44
    
I'd suggest HTMLParser/html.parser, but this solution is much better in this case. –  Robin Jun 13 '11 at 9:25
    
This was a useful pointer for additional research. I actually have some broken HTML to parse, so some other answers involving lxml.html also proved useful. –  Rob Fagen Jun 3 '14 at 21:50

Sven Marnach excellent solution is directly translatable into ElementTree which is part of recent Python distributions:

from xml.etree import ElementTree as ET

s = """<table>
  <tr><th>Event</th><th>Start Date</th><th>End Date</th></tr>
  <tr><td>a</td><td>b</td><td>c</td></tr>
  <tr><td>d</td><td>e</td><td>f</td></tr>
  <tr><td>g</td><td>h</td><td>i</td></tr>
</table>
"""

table = ET.XML(s)
rows = iter(table)
headers = [col.text for col in next(rows)]
for row in rows:
    values = [col.text for col in row]
    print dict(zip(headers, values))

same output as Sven Marnach's answer...

share|improve this answer

If the HTML is not XML you can't do it with etree. But even then, you don't have to use an external library for parsing a HTML table. In python 3 you can reach your goal with HTMLParser from html.parser. I've the code of the simple derived HTMLParser class here in a github repo.

You can use that class (here named HTMLTableParser) the following way:

import urllib.request
from html_table_parser import HTMLTableParser

target = 'http://www.twitter.com'

# get website content
req = urllib.request.Request(url=target)
f = urllib.request.urlopen(req)
xhtml = f.read().decode('utf-8')

# instantiate the parser and feed it
p = HTMLTableParser()
p.feed(xhtml)
print(p.tables)

The output of this is a list of 2D-lists representing tables. It looks maybe like this:

[[['   ', ' Anmelden ']],
 [['Land', 'Code', 'Für Kunden von'],
  ['Vereinigte Staaten', '40404', '(beliebig)'],
  ['Kanada', '21212', '(beliebig)'],
  ...
  ['3424486444', 'Vodafone'],
  ['  Zeige SMS-Kurzwahlen für andere Länder ']]]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.