Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say,I have 5 paragraphs in the page.

if I execute:

p_array=$('p');
second_p=$('p:eq(1)');
$.inArray(second_p,p_array);

I get -1. Any explanation?

share|improve this question
    
second_p is a jQuery object, and p_array is an array-like object which contains DOM nodes... Therefore, p_array obviously does not contain second_p. –  Šime Vidas Jun 13 '11 at 0:36
    
Why not second_p = p_array.eq(1);? You're doing two look-ups unnecessarily. –  Šime Vidas Jun 13 '11 at 0:38
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Neither p_array nor second_p are arrays.

They are jQuery objects.

More specifically, p_array is a jQuery object containing a set of 5 DOM nodes. second_p is a jQuery object containing a set of 1 DOM node.

$.inArray can function on these jQuery sets of nodes, but you can't compare a set against a set.

If you extract that one DOM node using the array subscript operator (jQueryObj[i]), then you're no longer comparing a set against a set:

var p_array=$('p');
var second_p=$('p:eq(1)');
alert($.inArray(second_p[0], p_array)); // result: 1

See a live demo here.

share|improve this answer
    
I got it.Really thanks. By the way, nice site! –  xiaohan2012 Jun 14 '11 at 12:39
    
@xiaohan2012: Yea, we like it :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 14 '11 at 12:39
add comment

Both p_array and second_p are array-like jQuery objects. You want to extract the actual DOM node for the <p> and test it like:

$.inArray(second_p[0], p_array);

That call returns 1 for me, as expected.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.