Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having a problem where calling recv() system call does not block. I have a client-server structure setup at the moment, and the problem I am having is I send the server one message, while the server is set up so that it's something like:

while (1) {
   char buf[1024];
   recv(fd, buf, sizeof(buf), flags);
   processMsg(buf);
}

It receives the first message correctly, but the recv() does not block and "receives" trash data which is not what is desired. I'd like to react to messages only when they are sent. Can anyone advise?

share|improve this question
8  
You better check for return code from recv. It can scream about an error while you are happily looking at some garbage in your buffer... –  user405725 Jun 13 '11 at 2:14
1  
You also need to think about the possibility of receiving part of a message or more bytes than one message's worth. If the sender transmits 500 byte messages your RECV call might only retrieve 200 bytes or it might retrieve 700 bytes (if your sender can transmit more than one message without waiting for a response). –  Frank Boyne Jun 13 '11 at 3:28
    
Should have included a link to this discussion of TCP Fragmentation in my previous comment. –  Frank Boyne Jun 13 '11 at 3:35
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

recv() does not necessarily block until the full request is fulfilled but can return a partial request. The return code will inform you of how many bytes were actually received which can be less than you requested. Even if you specify a MSG_WAITALL flag it can return less due to a signal, etc.

On posix systems, in blocking mode recv will only block until until some data is present to be read. It will then return that data, which may be less than requested, up to the amount requested. In non-blocking mode recv will return immediately if there is zero bytes of data to be read and will return -1, setting errno to EAGAIN or EWOULDBLOCK.

The upshot is that normally you will call recv in a loop until you get the amount you want while also checking for return codes of 0 (other side disconnected) or -1 (some error).

I can't speak to windows behavior.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There's two possibilities: either an error is occurring, or the socket is set to non-blocking mode. To see if an error is occurring, check the return value of recv:

while() {
    char buf[1024];
    int ret = recv(,buf,,)

    if(ret < 0) {
        // handle error
        printf("recv error: %s\n", strerror(errno));
    } else {
        // only use the first ret bytes of buf
        processMsg(buf, ret);
    }
}

To put the socket into non-blocking mode, or to query if a socket is in non-blocking mode, use fcntl(2) with the O_NONBLOCK flag:

// Test if the socket is in non-blocking mode:
if(fcntl(sockfd, F_GETFL) & O_NONBLOCK) {
    // socket is non-blocking
}

// Put the socket in non-blocking mode:
if(fcntl(sockfd, F_SETFL, fcntl(sockfd, F_GETFL) | O_NONBLOCK) < 0) {
    // handle error
}

Note that unless you're explicitly changing the blocking behavior, the socket should be blocking by default, so most likely an error is occurring.

share|improve this answer
3  
There's a typo in the second if statement (sockfg => sockfd) –  MonoThreaded Jan 9 '12 at 10:36
2  
This is more useful than the accepted answer... –  Wolfer Sep 6 '13 at 18:41
add comment

If you're on windows, run wsagetlasterror() function and look at the return value.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms741580%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

If you're on a posix compliant system look at errno

http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009695399/functions/errno.html

share|improve this answer
2  
Which are both meaningless unless recv returns -1. –  Ben Voigt Jun 13 '11 at 2:58
1  
indeedy, I'm astounded by your vast knowledge <(o.O)> –  ultifinitus Jun 13 '11 at 23:39
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.