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http://codepad.viper-7.com/ezvlkQ

So, I'm trying to figure out:


...?php

$object = new A();

class A 
{
  static public $foo = 'bar';
  function displayFoo()
  {
    echo $this->$foo;
  }
}

A::displayFoo();
A->displayFoo();
?>

About this, how many errors can you find? Can you tell me what they are in real human terms? I can't really interpret what is and what is not okay from the validator that codepad uses...

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3  
Is this homework? –  deceze Jun 13 '11 at 2:38
1  
Step 1: run the code. PHP Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_OBJECT_OPERATOR in ... on line 15 Step 2: fix that error. Repeat. –  Matthew Jun 13 '11 at 2:58
    
Deceze, no it isn't homework. Michael, I didn't solve it. –  Wolfpack'08 Jun 14 '11 at 8:20
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I’ve updated your code here http://codepad.viper-7.com/UaUE4g

Error 1:

echo $this->$foo;

This should read:

echo self::$foo;

.. as it is static.

Error 2:

A::displayFoo();

The method is an instance method :: is used for access to static methods.

Error 3:

A->displayFoo();

This is an error because A is undefined and if it was it should have read $A. This would be okay:

$object->displayFoo();

.. as $object is an instance of class A.

Next step, consult the manual on the topic static.

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1  
AW MAN, That was so cool. You're awesome. So legit. That's exactly what I was looking for. I kept wondering why my book said I could access static properties via static methods with object code. I just didn't realize that by using a->, I wasn't actually using the object ($myObject). So, static methods really can be accessed by object code, but they can't be accessed by class code? Hmm.... I guess it still doesn't make sense. I thought that static methods could be accessed by class or object code, but the book doesn't actually explicitly say that. Thanks. –  Wolfpack'08 Jun 14 '11 at 8:23
    
It sounds like you should get another book :) -- Happy coding! –  Michael Jun 14 '11 at 11:21
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Not sure where to start. Static methods belong to the class, normal methods belong to an object, an instantiation of that class. For example, you can have:

Class A {
   static public $foo = 'WOOHOOO';
   static function displayFoo() {
       echo self::$foo;
   }
}

echo A::displayFoo();

This works because you're calling the displayFoo method belonging to class A. Or you can do this:

Class A {
    public $foo = "WOOHOO";
    public function displayFoo() {
        echo $this->foo;
    }
}

$obj = new A();
$obj->displayFoo();

Now you're creating an object based on the class of A. That object can call its methods. But the object doesn't have static methods. If you were to declare the function static, it would not be available to $obj.

You can't do:

A->displayFoo()

at all, under any circumstances, ever. The -> operator assumes an object, and A can't be an object because its not a variable.

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Block 1: codepad.viper-7.com/Ou8xep (works). Block 2: codepad.viper-7.com/WYh7Xi (does not work). –  Wolfpack'08 Jun 14 '11 at 8:24
    
Also, block 1 works without "echo" on line 14: codepad.viper-7.com/kgjrWW –  Wolfpack'08 Jun 14 '11 at 8:27
    
block 2 works if you change $a to $obj. So, it still answers the question, but there's a new error in the code. Thank you. I appreciate your answer. thumbs up –  Wolfpack'08 Jun 14 '11 at 8:30
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You can read up on static class members in the manual here:

http://php.net/static

Pay close attention to the examples.

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