Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was playing around with drawing paths, and I noticed that in at least some cases, UIBezierPath outperforms what I thought would be a Core Graphics equivalent. The -drawRect: method below creates two paths: one UIBezierPath, and one CGPath. The paths are identical except for their locations, but stroking the CGPath takes roughly twice as long as stroking the UIBezierPath.

- (void)drawRect:(CGRect)rect
{
    CGContextRef ctx = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

    // Create the two paths, cgpath and uipath.
    CGMutablePathRef cgpath = CGPathCreateMutable();
    CGPathMoveToPoint(cgpath, NULL, 0, 100);

    UIBezierPath *uipath = [[UIBezierPath alloc] init];
    [uipath moveToPoint:CGPointMake(0, 200)];

    // Add 200 curve segments to each path.
    int iterations = 200;
    CGFloat cgBaseline = 100;
    CGFloat uiBaseline = 200;
    CGFloat xincrement = self.bounds.size.width / iterations;
    for (CGFloat x1 = 0, x2 = xincrement;
         x2 < self.bounds.size.width;
         x1 = x2, x2 += xincrement)
    {
        CGPathAddCurveToPoint(cgpath, NULL, x1, cgBaseline-50, x2, cgBaseline+50, x2, cgBaseline);
        [uipath addCurveToPoint:CGPointMake(x2, uiBaseline)
                  controlPoint1:CGPointMake(x1, uiBaseline-50)
                  controlPoint2:CGPointMake(x2, uiBaseline+50)];
    }
    [[UIColor blackColor] setStroke];
    CGContextAddPath(ctx, cgpath);

    // Stroke each path.
    [self strokeContext:ctx];
    [self strokeUIBezierPath:uipath];

    [uipath release];
    CGPathRelease(cgpath);
}

- (void)strokeContext:(CGContextRef)context
{
    CGContextStrokePath(context);
}

- (void)strokeUIBezierPath:(UIBezierPath*)path
{
    [path stroke];
}

Both paths use CGContextStrokePath(), so I created separate methods to stroke each path so that I can see the time used by each path in Instruments. Below are typical results (call tree inverted); you can see that -strokeContext: takes 9.5 sec., while -strokeUIBezierPath: takes only 5 sec.:

Running (Self)      Symbol Name
14638.0ms   88.2%               CGContextStrokePath
9587.0ms   57.8%                 -[QuartzTestView strokeContext:]
5051.0ms   30.4%                 -[UIBezierPath stroke]
5051.0ms   30.4%                  -[QuartzTestView strokeUIBezierPath:]

It looks like UIBezierPath is somehow optimizing the path that it creates, or I'm creating the CGPath in a naïve way. What can I do to speed up my CGPath drawing?

share|improve this question
2  
+1 that sounds counter-intutive. –  Grady Player Jun 13 '11 at 8:03
1  
I have generally found CoreGraphics to be very slow when drawing lines, paths etcetera. I have no idea why but I mostly have to go down to OpenGL or use Cocos2D for efficient drawing. Sure I understand that it's faster, but I don't really understand why CG is so very much slower, considering it should be using OpenGL itself. –  Accatyyc Jun 13 '11 at 9:18
3  
UIBezierPath is a wrapper around CGPathRef. What if you run both let's say, ten million times, then take the average, but don't use Instruments but two NSDate objects before and after the operations. –  user142019 Jun 13 '11 at 11:18
1  
@WTP, results are consistent on the device and in the simulator and don't change whether -drawRect: is called a few dozen times or a few hundred. I've tried it with as many as 80000 curve segments on the simulator (far too many for the device). The results are always about the same: CGPath takes about twice as long as UIBezierPath, even though both use CGContextStrokePath() to draw. It seems clear that the path that UIBezierPath constructs is somehow more efficient than the one I create with CGPathAddCurveToPoint(). I'd like to know how to construct efficient paths like UIBezierPath does. –  Caleb Jun 13 '11 at 15:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 107 down vote accepted

You are correct in that UIBezierPath is simply an objective-c wrapper for Core Graphics, and therefore will perform comparably. The difference (and reason for your performance delta) is your CGContext state when drawing your CGPath directly is quite different to that setup by UIBezierPath. If you look at UIBezierPath, it has settings for:

  • lineWidth,
  • lineJoinStyle,
  • lineCapStyle,
  • miterLimit and
  • flatness

When examining the call (disassembly) to [path stroke], you will note that it configures the current graphic context based on those previous values before performing the CGContextStrokePath call. If you do the same prior to drawing your CGPath, it will perform the same:

- (void)drawRect:(CGRect)rect
{
    CGContextRef ctx = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

    // Create the two paths, cgpath and uipath.
    CGMutablePathRef cgpath = CGPathCreateMutable();
    CGPathMoveToPoint(cgpath, NULL, 0, 100);

    UIBezierPath *uipath = [[UIBezierPath alloc] init];
    [uipath moveToPoint:CGPointMake(0, 200)];

    // Add 200 curve segments to each path.
    int iterations = 80000;
    CGFloat cgBaseline = 100;
    CGFloat uiBaseline = 200;
    CGFloat xincrement = self.bounds.size.width / iterations;
    for (CGFloat x1 = 0, x2 = xincrement;
         x2 < self.bounds.size.width;
         x1 = x2, x2 += xincrement)
    {
        CGPathAddCurveToPoint(cgpath, NULL, x1, cgBaseline-50, x2, cgBaseline+50, x2, cgBaseline);
        [uipath addCurveToPoint:CGPointMake(x2, uiBaseline)
                  controlPoint1:CGPointMake(x1, uiBaseline-50)
                  controlPoint2:CGPointMake(x2, uiBaseline+50)];
    }
    [[UIColor blackColor] setStroke];
    CGContextAddPath(ctx, cgpath);

    // Stroke each path
    CGContextSaveGState(ctx); {
        // configure context the same as uipath
        CGContextSetLineWidth(ctx, uipath.lineWidth);
        CGContextSetLineJoin(ctx, uipath.lineJoinStyle);
        CGContextSetLineCap(ctx, uipath.lineCapStyle);
        CGContextSetMiterLimit(ctx, uipath.miterLimit);
        CGContextSetFlatness(ctx, uipath.flatness);
        [self strokeContext:ctx];
        CGContextRestoreGState(ctx);
    }
    [self strokeUIBezierPath:uipath];

    [uipath release];
    CGPathRelease(cgpath);
}

- (void)strokeContext:(CGContextRef)context
{
    CGContextStrokePath(context);
}

- (void)strokeUIBezierPath:(UIBezierPath*)path
{
    [path stroke];
}

Snapshot from Instruments: Instruments snapshot showing equal performance

share|improve this answer
5  
Thanks for taking the time to look into this and write such a clear explanation. This is really a great answer. –  Caleb Jun 15 '11 at 6:18
13  
+1 for the atari bruce lee icon... and possibly for the answer. –  Grady Player Jul 19 '11 at 19:12
5  
So ... the 2x performance difference was one or more of the cgcontext settings - e.g. perhaps something like: "lineWidth of 2.0 performs worse than lineWidth of 1.0" ... ? –  Adam Mar 13 '12 at 14:05
2  
@Adam, yes exactly –  Stuart Carnie Mar 16 '12 at 17:04
2  
FWIW I've always found line width of 1.0 to be the fastest - my assumption is because mitering becomes an issue for widths > 1px. –  Mark Aufflick Sep 23 '13 at 10:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.