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I need to chek where the char c index is on string , and if the char c is'nt there - return -1.

public class Find {
    private String _st;
    int i;

    public Find(String st) {
        _st = st;
    }

    public int whatIstheIndex(char c) {
        for (i=0;i<_st.length();i++)
            if (_st.charAt(i) == c) {
                return i;
            } else {
                return -1;
            }
        return i;
    }
}

I'm getting always -1. Why? Is the last return i; unnecessary?

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1  
I've reindented your code consistently in the sort of format that Eclipse will do automatically. If you look at it, you can now see just how there's a binary choice between two returns in the loop. Guess what it does the first time through the loop? –  Donal Fellows Jun 13 '11 at 8:11
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8 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code should be like this:

public int whatIstheIndex(char c) {

        for (int i = 0; i < _st.length(); i++)

            if (_st.charAt(i) == c) {
                return i;
            } 

        return -1;

    }

Hope this helps!

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Great ! thank you –  Bside Jun 13 '11 at 7:57
    
@Bside: Do you understand why this is what you should have written? –  Donal Fellows Jun 13 '11 at 8:12
    
In honestly? 10 seconds after i posted this question, i succeed to understand what is the problem. and @Sandeep Jindal wrote exactly what i've understood. –  Bside Jun 13 '11 at 8:28
    
Now i'm trying to understand the indexOf(string str) :) ..in honestly (2) .. i'm trying to learn for test.. i sould to do that homework but not must. i want only to understand. –  Bside Jun 13 '11 at 8:34
1  
It's called 'rubber duck debugging' (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubber_duck_debugging) –  Adriaan Koster Jun 13 '11 at 8:50
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Remove the else clause, it's returning -1 if the first character in the string isn't correct.

You would then also need to change the return statement at the end of the method.

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Why don't you just use the built-in indexOf method? That would be a lot easier and quicker than looping through the string and testing each and every character.

But if you have to use this method for some strange reason, get rid of your else clause, because it makes the function return -1 every time the character tested is not matched.

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1  
It's probably homework :) –  Kaj Jun 13 '11 at 7:55
    
Yeah, I assumed as much. –  James Allardice Jun 13 '11 at 7:55
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Here is an alternative solution which also works.

public int whatIstheIndex(char c) {
    int result = -1;
    for (int i = 0; i < _st.length(); i++) {
        if (_st.charAt(i) == c) {
            result = i;
        } 
    }
    return result;
}

It's just a different way of thinking about the problem. I suppose it's slightly "worse" because it adds an extra line of code, but I hope you see how/why this works.

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I supposed this is okay for this question too, at least from my opinion. +1 for you. –  Jasonw Jun 14 '11 at 1:37
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Why not use String.indexOf(int) method.

public  int whatIstheIndex (char c) {
    return _st.indexOf(c);
}

Else, return a -1 only after the loop finishes:

public  int whatIstheIndex (char c) {

    for (i=0;i<_st.length();i++)

        if (_st.charAt(i) == c )  {
           return i;
        }
    }

    return -1;
}
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Because i need to do that with some limited options... thanks anyway –  Bside Jun 13 '11 at 8:03
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What's happening is that it's looking at the first character, and if that doesn't match, it immediately returns -1 (and hence, doesn't continue looping through the chars until it finds the right one).

You need to return -1 only if you have finished the for loop and have not found the character. So it needs to be:

public int whatIstheIndex(char c) {
    for (i = 0; i < _st.length(); i++) {
        if (_st.charAt(i) == c) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}
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You are always returning after looking at the first character. Your test doesn't look at other characters. A debugger would show you this. The last return i is only called if the length is 0.

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Your current implementation will only ever return one of two values, 0, or -1. 0 is returned when the first index is that which the character resides, or -1 if its not found there. Remove the else clause and return -1 after you've finished the for loop to indicate that you've exhaustively searched all indexes, and found no answer.

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