Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I´m getting a lot of dates from a JSON feed.

They look like this: \/Date(1307972400000+0200)\/

I need to parse these dates into hours and minutes using Java.

EDIT:

This is how far I´ve come:

String s = dateString.replaceAll("^/Date\\(" , "");

This gives me the following output: 1307972400000+0200)/

How can I strip the rest of this string, any suggestions?

I want it to like this: 1307972400000L

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

How can I strip the rest of this string, any suggestions?

I want it to like this: 1307972400000L

Strictly speaking, you could just get the substring from the start to the '+' character.

String input = "/Date(1307972400000+0200)/";
String result = input.replaceAll("^/Date\\(" , "");
result = result.substring(0, result.indexOf('+'));
System.out.println(new Long(result));
share|improve this answer
add comment

It is JSON feed from .Net service. I'm using this code:

public class GsonHelper {
    public static Gson createWcfGson() {
        GsonBuilder gsonb = new GsonBuilder();
        gsonb.registerTypeAdapter(Date.class, new WcfDateDeserializer());
        Gson gson = gsonb.create();
        return gson;
    }

    private static class WcfDateDeserializer implements JsonDeserializer<Date>, JsonSerializer<Date> {

        public Date deserialize(JsonElement json, Type typeOfT, JsonDeserializationContext context) throws JsonParseException {
            String JSONDateToMilliseconds = "\\/(Date\\((.*?)(\\+.*)?\\))\\/";
            Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(JSONDateToMilliseconds);
            Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(json.getAsJsonPrimitive().getAsString());
            String result = matcher.replaceAll("$2");
            return new Date(new Long(result));
    }

        @Override
        public JsonElement serialize(Date date, Type arg1, JsonSerializationContext arg2) {
            return new JsonPrimitive("/Date(" + date.getTime() + ")/");
        }
    }
}

It registers custom serializer and deserializer for Date type. Using is simple: Gson gson = GsonHelper.createWcfGson(); and do what you want.

Upd: Sorry, previous example doesn't work with timezones. It's easier to use Calendar to take into account timezone offset. Code will look like this:

public class GsonHelper {
    public static Gson createWcfGson() {
        GsonBuilder gsonb = new GsonBuilder();
        gsonb.registerTypeAdapter(Date.class, new WcfCalendarDeserializer ());
        Gson gson = gsonb.create();
        return gson;
    }

    public static class WcfCalendarDeserializer implements JsonDeserializer<Calendar>, JsonSerializer<Calendar> {

        public Calendar deserialize(JsonElement json, Type typeOfT, JsonDeserializationContext context) throws JsonParseException {

            String JSONDateToMilliseconds = "\\/(Date\\((.*?)(\\+.*)?\\))\\/";
            Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile(JSONDateToMilliseconds);
            Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(json.getAsJsonPrimitive().getAsString());
            matcher.matches();
            String tzone = matcher.group(3);
            String result = matcher.replaceAll("$2");

            Calendar calendar = new GregorianCalendar();
            calendar.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("GMT" + tzone));
            calendar.setTimeInMillis(new Long(result));

            return calendar;
        }

        @Override
        public JsonElement serialize(Calendar calendar, Type arg1, JsonSerializationContext arg2) {
            return new JsonPrimitive("/Date(" + calendar.getTimeInMillis() + ")/");
        }
    }
}

Then you can use returned Calendar object to get hours and minutes (and adjust timezone if needed).

calendar.get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY);
calendar.get(Calendar.MINUTE);
share|improve this answer
    
he should adjust timezone (+0200) –  Selvin Jun 13 '11 at 13:40
    
I don´t know if I´m just stupid, but I didn´t get this to work –  Magnus Jun 13 '11 at 14:26
    
Sorry, in your case it wouldn't work. This code doesn't work with timezones. Later I'll try to change it. –  Sergey Glotov Jun 13 '11 at 14:30
    
I get everything I need from the JSON feed, my only problem is to parse the date from JSON Format to hours and minutes –  Magnus Jun 13 '11 at 14:31
3  
here is regex expression that works for all zones \\/(Date\\((-*.*?)([\\+\\-].*)?\\))\\/ –  Jovan Sep 8 '11 at 10:16
show 1 more comment

To augment accepted answer by @Programmer Bruce you can simply use this:

public static Long getTime(String date) {
    if (Utils.isEmpty(date))
        return -1l;
    String t = date.substring(date.indexOf('(') + 1);
    if (date.contains("+"))
        t = t.substring(0, t.indexOf('+'));
    else if (date.contains("-"))
        t = t.substring(0, t.indexOf('-'));
    else
        t = t.substring(0, t.indexOf(')'));
    return new Long(t);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.