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i have to delete every word containing at least one number from each file given through the command line as parameter. this is my code:

while [ "$*" != "" ]; do
    if [ ! -f $1 ]
        then echo "$1 not file"
    else
        sed -ie  "s/[^ ]*[0-9][^ ]*//g" $1
    fi
    shift
done

it works perfectly if i have only one file, but if i have more it gives the same result for each. after i run the script in each file there will be the result of the firstone.

can someone tell me what im missing?

thanks, in advance

EDIT2:

this is what im running now

while [ "$#" -ne 0 ]; do
for file in "$@"; do
    if [ ! -e "$file" ]; then
        printf "file doesn't exist: %s\n" "$file"
        continue;
    fi
    if [ ! -f "$file" ]; then
        printf "not a file: %s\n" "$file"
        continue;
    fi
done
    sed -i "s/[^ ]*[0-9][^ ]*//g" "$file"
done

i was talking about the done for the while loop and the done for the for loop. but even without that my script keeps running.

EDIT:

bascially the same thing just a bit different. i have to delete the second and fourth word from each line from each file (word only contain alphanumeric characters). its not working properly and i cant find the error. this is my code:

while [ "$*" != "" ]; do
    if [ ! -f $1 ]
        then echo "$1 not file"
    else
        sed -ie  's/^\( *[^ ]+\) +[^ ]+\(.*\)/\1\2/
                  s/^\( *[^ ]+\)\( +[^ ]+\) +[^ ]+\(.*\)/\1\2\3/g' $1
    fi
    shift
done

Again any help would be appreciated, thanks.

share|improve this question
    
you don't need the while loop if you're going to use the for loop. Just use what I answered, it replaces all of your first code snippet. –  c00kiemon5ter Jun 13 '11 at 16:05
    
oh. right. works perfectly ty :) –  Bando Jun 13 '11 at 16:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

the while loop condition should check if there are no arguments, and if there are it should continue. So the right form would be

while [ "$#" -ne 0 ]; do

Now, what you really want is to get each argument and do something with it. That automatically implies a for loop. So what you really should be doing is

for file in $@; do

Now, a file can have spaces in it, so getting that filename and checking if it is really a file should be quoted, and you should also check for existance first

for file in "$@"; do
    if [ ! -e "$file" ]; then
        printf "file doesn't exist: %s\n" "$file"
        continue;
    fi
    if [ ! -f "$file" ]; then
        printf "not a file: %s\n" "$file"
        continue;
    fi
    sed -i "s/[^ ]*[0-9][^ ]*//g" "$file"
done

I could expand more on sed where the -i switch is restricted only to GNU sed. Apart from that you may also want to keep a backup of that file in case something goes wrong.
But this is another topic I guess.

share|improve this answer
    
the code you posted gave me this error: "sed5jo.sh: 8: Syntax error: "do" unexpected (expecting "then")" , but using while [ "$#" -ne 0 ]; do seems to have solved my problem. tyvm. any suggestions to the 2nd problem im having? (wrote it in the edit) im not too good with patterns :( –  Bando Jun 13 '11 at 15:25
    
whoops, you're right, it's if [..]; then not if [..]; do my fault, fixed now. –  c00kiemon5ter Jun 13 '11 at 15:32
    
hmm. youve missed done before the sed command. and if its added the script starts running and it works correctly, but doesnt stop. any idea why? –  Bando Jun 13 '11 at 15:37
    
I'm not sure what you're talking about. done is there as it should be, sed runs for every file. The script should come to end when all files are processed. What's the script you're running ? –  c00kiemon5ter Jun 13 '11 at 15:45
    
will post it as edit. –  Bando Jun 13 '11 at 15:54

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