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If I have a function like this:

function foo(_this) {
    console.log(_this);
}

function bar() {}
bar.prototype.func = function() {
    foo(this);
}

var test = new bar();
test.func();

then the test instance of bar gets logged.

However, for this to work I have to pass the this in the bar.prototype.func function. I was wondering whether it is possible to obtain the same this value without passing this.

I tried using arguments.callee.caller, but this returns the prototype function itself and not the this value inside the prototype function.

Is it possible to log the test instance of bar by only calling foo() in the prototype function?

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1  
No you cannot access the context of functions up the call stack. You have to pass this context along. –  Raynos Jun 13 '11 at 14:54
    
Is there a reason you don't want to pass this if you are already going to be creating a special purpose function for logging attached to bar's prototype? Is there a reason other than for learning purposes to use this pattern? –  TNi Jun 13 '11 at 15:01
    
@TNi: It does not necessarily have a pratical purpose, but it would be useful in my scenario. I'm trying to make a multi-level for loop by just passing a function and bounds to a function, which executes the function as it would with for loops. In a regular for loop, one can access this, but in this way it seems like I need to pass this to my function. –  pimvdb Jun 13 '11 at 15:04
2  
i think your original approach is the proper one. The best practice is to pass the instance of the object to the global function. –  venimus Jun 13 '11 at 15:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the question is 'without passing this (by any means)' then answer is no

value can be passed by alternative methods though. For example using global var (within Bar class) or session or cookies.

    function bar() {

      var myThis;

      function foo() {
          console.log(myThis);
      }

      bar.prototype.func = function() {

          myThis = this;
           foo();
      }
   }

   var test = new bar();
   test.func();
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2  
Your still passing this around. I find foo.apply(this) to be a lot cleaner / less hackish. –  Raynos Jun 13 '11 at 15:03
    
I'm not passing it around, but setting value to a variable that is accessible within the namespace of the Bar class. That is a good and right way to do it. –  Dmitriy Naumov Jun 13 '11 at 15:05
    
@Raynos: That's correct, but I accepted because of stating that's it not possible. That basically answers my question. –  pimvdb Jun 13 '11 at 15:05
    
@pimvdb: thank you. –  Dmitriy Naumov Jun 13 '11 at 15:08
    
@DmitriyNaurnov your not passing it around through function arguments, your passing it around through bar local scope and it's a hack –  Raynos Jun 13 '11 at 15:13

I think calling foo within the context of bar should work:

function foo() {
    console.log(this.testVal);
}

function bar() { this.testVal = 'From bar with love'; }
bar.prototype.func = function() {
    foo.call(this);
}

var test = new bar();
test.func(); //=> 'From bar with love'
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but I still need to pass the this value. What I mean is that I should be able to obtain this inside foo, by just calling foo() inside func. –  pimvdb Jun 13 '11 at 14:53
    
But ehr, that's what happens here, or did I misunderstood your question? Calling foo like in my answer makes this from instance test available to foo, as is demonstrated by logging the testVal property of it via log. –  KooiInc Jun 13 '11 at 14:57
    
I'm really sorry for not being clear. I meant obtaining the this of func within foo without actually passing this in func. –  pimvdb Jun 13 '11 at 14:59
    
Ok, I don't really see the use of that, but hey. Actually foo.call(this) doesn't pass this (as you can see, foo has no parameters, nothing is passed), but sets the context of foo to this, being the instance created by the bar constructor –  KooiInc Jun 13 '11 at 15:02

You can do this without changing the external function, but you must change the way you call it.

You can't get the context of the caller, but you can set the this property on a function you call with the method apply or call. See this reference for an explanation on this.

function foo()
{
    console.log( this );
}

function bar()
{
    bar.prototype.func = function func() 
    {
        foo.apply( this );
    };
}

var test = new bar();
test.func();

Usually if this is used, it's in an object oriented context. Trying to call a method of an object with another this might indicate poor design. Explain a bit more what you are trying to achieve for more applicable design patterns.

For an example of a javascript OOP paradigm, check my answer here.

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this should work

function bar() {var self=this};
function foo() {
    console.log(self);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure but self is not defined within the scope of foo is it? –  pimvdb Jun 13 '11 at 14:54
    
sorry i thought foo is a method of bar –  venimus Jun 13 '11 at 15:06
    
Still wouldn't work –  Raynos Jun 13 '11 at 15:12
    
see Dmitriy Naumov answer that is the same i had in mind but misread the question. I often use similar approach and it works for sure. –  venimus Jun 13 '11 at 15:21

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