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I have the following class:

class DB {

    private $name;

    public function load($name) {
        $this->name = $name;
        return $this;
    }

    public function get() {
        return $this->name;
    }
}

At the moment if I do:

$db = new DB();
echo $db->load('foo')->get() . "<br>";
echo $db->load('fum')->get() . "<br>";

This outputs "foo" then "fum".

However if I do this:

$db = new DB(); 
$foo = $db->load('foo');
$fum = $db->load('fum');
echo $foo->get() . "<br>";
echo $fum->get() . "<br>";

It always outputs "fum".

I can sort of see why it would do that, but how could I keep the variable seperate to each instance without having to create a new instance of DB?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

IF you mean for DB to be some sort of database connectivity object (which I assume you are), multiple instances may not be the best choice. Perhaps something like this may be what you are trying to do:

$db = new DB(); 
$foo = $db->load('foo')->get();
$fum = $db->load('fum')->get();
echo $foo . "<br>";
echo $fum . "<br>";

If what I think you are trying to do is correct, it may be better to separate your get logic from the DB class into its own Record class.

class Record {
    function __construct($name) {
        $this->name = $name;
    }

    function get(){
        return $this->name;
    }

    private $name;
}

class DB {

    public function load($name) {
        return new Record($name);
    }
}

$db = new DB(); 
$foo = $db->load('foo');
$fum = $db->load('fum');
echo $foo->get() . "<br>";
echo $fum->get() . "<br>";
share|improve this answer
    
If you read my code I have already done that, I am trying to re-use the class without having to initiate it again each time whilst keeping the variables seperate. –  fire Jun 13 '11 at 15:13
    
This is slightly different than what you have above, it keeps the variables separate without initializing the class again. –  GWW Jun 13 '11 at 15:16
    
Yes but if I wanted to use $foo and call another function further down the code I would have to run $db->load again! –  fire Jun 13 '11 at 15:18

To keep it separate to each instance, you would, by definition, need to create a new instance... You could do that though in the load() method. Instead of returning $this, you could return a new DB() configured the way you want. Then make the method static.

This is what's called the factory pattern.

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have tried this but same problem - pastebin.com/DgBrhmtf –  fire Jun 13 '11 at 15:09
    
@fire that's not what I mean... The factory method should not return a singleton, but rather a new instance. –  rid Jun 13 '11 at 15:14

What you're experiencing in your code is similar to PHP's pass by reference feature.

When you set the first variable, $foo is equal to the value of $db->name, when you call it again to set it to 'fum', you're setting $fum equal to $db->name. Since you're echoing them both at the end, they're both going to be the last value you set it to.

Try this and see if your results are different.

$db = new DB(); 

$foo = $db->load('foo');
echo $foo->get() . "<br>";

$fum = $db->load('fum');
echo $fum->get() . "<br>";

When you run $db->load(), create a new object and return that instead of the object you're currently in.

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What does this have to do with pass-by-reference? From what I see: nothing. He's just manipulating the same instance thorough the code (he's never passing it anywhere). The rest of your answer is right though. –  netcoder Jun 13 '11 at 15:14
    
left out the words 'similar to' –  castis Jun 13 '11 at 15:16

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