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I want to make a nice, modern-looking transitions between pages. I've found this tutorial: http://www.onextrapixel.com/2010/02/23/how-to-use-jquery-to-make-slick-page-transitions/

The author uses JQuery to make it work, but I want to do it in pure HTML5. Is there a feature in HTML5 to do it, say, in CSS?

UPDATE

In the end of 2014, I'd like to add the following comment. Before doing it think twice, wouldn't it be better to make a single-page AJAX web-app with CSS3 transitions between DIVs. The question describes a very special situation which is extremely rare. In the rest 99% cases a single page app is the best solution.

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1  
I wonder if the transition property may be what you are looking for, but it is a css3 solution. You could try it on the body element. cardeo.ca/2010/creating-a-fading-link-transition-with-css3 – James Black Jun 13 '11 at 15:15
3  
this is not an answer to your question, but I checked how this works and I wouldn't recommend it: The fade-out just delays the time the new page takes to start loading and I don't see really anything remarkable about the effect. – George Katsanos Jun 13 '11 at 15:38
    
Thank you, but as far as I understood, there are two states of a link: normal and hover, so we can set the styles for both states, as well as transitions parameters, and the rest is being done by the browser. But I have a button, changing window.location in onclick, and I'm out of ideas, how to make 2 states for body: loaded (normal) and loading (faded-out). – noober Jun 13 '11 at 15:56
up vote 7 down vote accepted

index.htm:

<html>
<head>

<style>
body,html,iframe { width: 100%; height: 100%; margin: 0; border: 0; }

#mainframe.normal
{
    opacity: 1.0;
}
#mainframe.faded
{
    opacity: 0.0;
}
#mainframe
{
        /* Firefox */
        -moz-transition-property: opacity;
        -moz-transition-duration: 3s;
        /* WebKit */
        -webkit-transition-property: opacity;
        -webkit-transition-duration: 3s;
        /* Standard */
        transition-property: opacity;
        transition-duration: 3s;
}

</style>

<script language="javascript">
function change()
{
    document.getElementById('mainframe').className="faded";
    setTimeout(function()
    {
        document.getElementById('mainframe').src='page2.htm';
        document.getElementById('mainframe').className="normal";
    }, (2 * 1000));
}
</script>
</head>

<body style="background-color:black;">
<iframe id="mainframe" class="normal" src="page1.htm"></iframe>
</body>

</html>

page1.htm

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body style="background-color: pink;">
Hi, I'm page1

<button onclick="parent.change();">
click me
</button>

</body>
</html>

page2.htm

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body style="background-color: pink;">
Hi, I'm page2
</body>
</html>
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This is based on the correct answer posted above which helped me a lot. Unfortunately, it was not working for me in chrome/linux, it worked well in firefox. I was looking for something slightly different anyway, because I wanted a common header in all pages. So here is my adatped solution.

<html>
<head>

<style>
body,html,iframe { width: 100%; height: 100%; margin: 0; border: 0; }

#mainframe.normal
{
    opacity: 1.0;
}
#mainframe.faded
{
    opacity: 0.0;
}
#mainframe
{
        /* Firefox */
        -moz-transition-property: opacity;
        -moz-transition-duration: 3s;
        /* WebKit */
        -webkit-transition-property: opacity;
        -webkit-transition-duration: 3s;
        /* Standard */
        transition-property: opacity;
        transition-duration: 3s;
}

</style>

<!--<script language="javascript">-->
<script>
function change(page)
{
//  document.write('Hello World');
    document.getElementById('mainframe').className="faded";
    setTimeout(function()
    {
        document.getElementById('mainframe').src=page+'.html';
        document.getElementById('mainframe').className="normal";
    }, (2 * 1000));
}
</script>
</head>

<body style="background-color:black;">
    <header id="header">
        <h2 id="name">
            FRANCISCO</br>
            FRANCHETTI
        </h2>
        <nav id="pages">
            <ul id="list-nav">
                <li class="current"><a onclick="change('home')" href="#">HOME</a></li>
                <li><a onclick="change('research')" href="#">RESEARCH</a></li>
                <li><a onclick="change('teaching')" href="#">TEACHING</a></li>
                <li><a onclick="change('contact')" href="#">CONTACT</a></li>
            </ul>
        </nav>
    </header>
    <iframe id="mainframe" class="normal" src="home.html"></iframe>
</body>

</html>

Main Remarks:

  • The pages do not need to have buttons or anything, here the handler is the header which is common to all pages.
  • The href attributes are disabled because we don't want to really navigate, just repopulate the src for the iframe.
  • Now the change() function takes a parameter page that is used to determine which page to load; as said before, instead of passing the destination for the a in the href attribute, we pass it as a function argument for change().
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