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I am using Outlook 2003.

What is the best way to send email (through Outlook 2003) using Python?

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1  
Why do you want to send the email through Outlook? –  ThiefMaster Jun 13 '11 at 15:34
    
@ThiefMaster: my smtp server is not the same as my email -- hence, I need to channel my smtp through my internet provider (att), even though I am using a different email address (not att's) to send the email. Outlook is already configured to handle this. If there are other solutions (non-Outlook based) that will also support this, I'd be happy to hear suggestions. –  user3262424 Jun 13 '11 at 18:11
    
The proper solution is using python's smtplib –  ThiefMaster Jun 13 '11 at 18:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use the smtplib that comes with python. Note that this will require your email account allows smtp, which is not necessarily enabled by default.

SERVER = "your.mail.server"
FROM = "yourEmail@yourAddress.com"
TO = ["listOfEmails"] # must be a list

SUBJECT = "Subject"
TEXT = ""Your Text"

# Prepare actual message
message = """From: %s\r\nTo: %s\r\nSubject: %s\r\n\

%s
""" % (FROM, ", ".join(TO), SUBJECT, TEXT)

# Send the mail
server = smtplib.SMTP(SERVER)
server.sendmail(FROM, TO, message)
server.quit()

EDIT: this example uses a fictional google mail to another google mail

SERVER = "smtp.google.com"
FROM = "johnDoe@gmail.com"
TO = ["JaneDoe@gmail.com"] # must be a list

SUBJECT = "Hello!"
TEXT = ""This is a test of emailing through smtp in google."

# Prepare actual message
message = """From: %s\r\nTo: %s\r\nSubject: %s\r\n\

%s
""" % (FROM, ", ".join(TO), SUBJECT, TEXT)

# Send the mail
server = smtplib.SMTP(SERVER)
server.login("MrDoe", "PASSWORD")
server.sendmail(FROM, TO, message)
server.quit()

For it to actually work, Mr. Doe will need to go to the options tab in gmail and set it to allow smtp connections. Note the addition of the login line to authenticate to the remote server. The original version does not include this, an oversight on my part.

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2  
This was not the question. The question is about using the Win32 API in order to control Outlook –  Andreas Jung Jun 13 '11 at 15:38
    
@Spencer Rathbun: thank you. The problem is this: my smtp server is not the same as my email -- hence, I need to channel my smtp through my internet provider (att), even though I am using a different email address (not att's) to send the email. Outlook is already configured to handle this. If there are other solutions (non-Outlook based) that will also support this, I'd be happy to hear suggestions. –  user3262424 Jun 13 '11 at 18:12
    
@user3262424 So your email address is not the same as your smtp server? That should be handled on the smtp server. It needs to be set to pass on emails that don't originate there to the proper email server. Incorrectly set up, this allows spammers to loop through you. But presumably, you know the ip addresses involved and can set them on an allow list. –  Spencer Rathbun Jun 13 '11 at 18:24
    
@Spencer Rathbun: thank you, but I am not sure how to use your script. I am not successful sending an email using it. –  user3262424 Jun 13 '11 at 18:47
    
@user3262424 Most of the problems I've had with this thing involve settings on the server side. If the script gets to the server.sendmail line and hangs for a bit, then reports an error, you have a server settings issue. The error will help with debugging the problem.You say though that outlook is already set up to use the smtp server, in which case you should be able to use the settings outlook has for everything. If the server is bouncing you, it just means that you need to allow smtp on it. What smtp server are you using? –  Spencer Rathbun Jun 13 '11 at 18:54
import win32com.client as win32
outlook = win32.Dispatch('outlook.application')
mail = outlook.CreateItem(0)
mail.To = 'to address'
mail.Subject = 'Message subject'
mail.body = 'Message body'
mail.send

Will use your local outlook account to send

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using pywin32:

from win32com.client import Dispatch

session = Dispatch('MAPI.session')
session.Logon('','',0,1,0,0,'exchange.foo.com\nUserName');
msg = session.Outbox.Messages.Add('Hello', 'This is a test')
msg.Recipients.Add('Corey', 'SMTP:corey@foo.com')
msg.Send()
session.Logoff()
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thank you. Will this not generate the annoying outlook error message? –  user3262424 Jun 13 '11 at 18:13
1  
it might trigger a validation on newer versions of windows. not sure how you would suppress that. I don't run windows anymore. –  Corey Goldberg Jun 13 '11 at 18:20

Check via Google, there are lots of examples, see here for one.

Inlined for ease of viewing:

import win32com.client

def send_mail_via_com(text, subject, recipient, profilename="Outlook2003"):
    s = win32com.client.Dispatch("Mapi.Session")
    o = win32com.client.Dispatch("Outlook.Application")
    s.Logon(profilename)

    Msg = o.CreateItem(0)
    Msg.To = recipient

    Msg.CC = "moreaddresses here"
    Msg.BCC = "address"

    Msg.Subject = subject
    Msg.Body = text

    attachment1 = "Path to attachment no. 1"
    attachment2 = "Path to attachment no. 2"
    Msg.Attachments.Add(attachment1)
    Msg.Attachments.Add(attachment2)

    Msg.Send()
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thank you, this is good. The problem is, Outlook keeps generating an alert message asking me if I'd like to continue or alternatively, terminate the accessing script. Is there a way to skip this alert message? –  user3262424 Jun 13 '11 at 18:08
    
@user3262424 - What's the exact content of the popup? –  Steve Townsend Jun 13 '11 at 18:23
    
I am not next to that computer right now. Something informing that a script is trying to access outlook and that it might be a virus etc. and if I want to continue. –  user3262424 Jun 13 '11 at 18:45
    
That could be some antivirus addin doing email screening then. I doubt you can bypass that without manual action on the desktop to disable it. Annoying. –  Steve Townsend Jun 13 '11 at 18:47

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