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I have the following code:

public interface IDrilldown
{
   void AddCriteria<T>(T Criterion);
}

public class MyClass<W> : IDrilldown // where W : class
{
    void IDrilldown.AddCriteria<T>(T Criterion)
    {
       W value = Criterion as W;
       ...
    }
}

Unfortunately, the cast I have above will not work unless W has the constaint in the code. I would like to have this using value types. Is it at all possible?

I cannot make W and T the same type. My interface does not have a type associated with it globally, only the internal data types.

This is so that I can have a List all having different T's

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9  
What stops you from calling AddCriteria<int> on a MyClass<string>? The compiler is telling you that you are violating type safety because you are violating type safety. Look at it this way: the contract of the IDrilldown interface is that a criterion can be of any type. You can't come along and make an implementation that requires the type to be of type W; in that case you are not implementing the contract. How could the user of the interface know that there is an extra constraint in there that is nowhere in the contract? –  Eric Lippert Jun 13 '11 at 15:47
    
I understand that is the issue. I'm moreso trying to modify the class design above so that I'm no longer violating the contract. In the end, I'm basically looking for a List of intefaces, where each one has internal list of varying types value and ref classes. –  greggorob64 Jun 13 '11 at 15:54
    
What do you need to do with W that requires you to have access to the entire object? Can Criterion be implemented as an interface that describes what you need to do to it? Are you just trying to call .ToString() on all of the criterion objects? –  Dave White Jun 13 '11 at 15:58
    
So why not just have a List<object> of criteria then? If a criterion is not guaranteed to be a W, but rather a criterion can be of any type T, then I think List<object> is the best you're going to do. –  Eric Lippert Jun 13 '11 at 16:24
    
I was concerned about the time penalty of packing and unpacking value types. The list can grow upwards of 500k. –  greggorob64 Jun 13 '11 at 17:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I was able to find a way to do it, it's a little hacky but allows it to work:

class MyClass<W> : IDrilldown {
    void IDrilldown.AddCriteria<T>(T Criterion) {
        if (Criterion is W) {
            W value = (W)Convert.ChangeType(Criterion, typeof(W));
            // value is W, have fun
            // or - as Snowbear pointed out in the comments
            W value = (W)(object)Criterion;
            // works just as well....
        } else {
            // value is NOT W and could not be converted.
        }
    }
}

The only drawback with this is, Convert.ChangeType will use converters to change between internal objects, so string value = (string)Convert.ChangeType(1, typeof(string)) will work and return "1" instead of throwing an exception.

To clarify on how this works, the documentation states:

For the conversion to succeed, value must implement the IConvertible interface, because the method simply wraps a call to an appropriate IConvertible method. The method requires that conversion of value to conversionType be supported.

so for this method to work with custom types you will need to implement the IConvertible interface to convert from one custom type to any other type. In the code sample above, if both T and W are the same type, the Convert.ChangeType will succeed, even if the custom object does not implement IConvertiable.

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I'm'a try that right now, thanks :) –  greggorob64 Jun 13 '11 at 15:50
1  
if Criterion is W why don't you want to use W value = (W)(object)Criterion instead? It seems to be easier. –  Snowbear Jun 13 '11 at 15:58
1  
@Snowbear: Because... because... ... I... I never thought of it like that. That method reminds me a bit of casting (void*) in C (reinterpret_cast<void*> for the C++ folks). Of course, both ways have the same stink because you're telling the compiler to ignore the types... :) –  Joshua Jun 13 '11 at 16:01
1  
@Snowbear, it is one of the worst things I would do, but if he doesn't want to have strong typing anyway... –  Snowbear Jun 13 '11 at 16:03
2  
Based on his comments, apparently the point of this exercise is to avoid a boxing penalty; in that case, neither solution is good because they both involve expensive operations. –  Eric Lippert Jun 13 '11 at 17:15

Would the dynamic keyword help you out?

Something like this:

public interface IDrilldown
{
   void AddCriteria<T>(T Criterion);
}

public class MyClass : IDrilldown
{
    void IDrilldown.AddCriteria<T>(T criterion)
    {
       dynamic value = criterion;
       // can use typeof() to figure out type if needed...
       ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, it doesn't work in .net 2.0 (c++). Thanks though. –  greggorob64 Jun 13 '11 at 17:40

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