Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've created a service to which I can connect to, download the contract and see the available methods. The problem being everytime I call one of the available methods, then following error appears in the WCFTestClient;

Inner Exception: The server has rejected the client credentials.

Inner Exception: The logon attempt failed

Now my setup works perfect locally on my development machine, however the error occurs when I place the service on a remote on a different domain, and on a different network. Now I've played around with the WCF config settings however, noticing that even if I set security mode to "None", then it automatically defaults to

<security mode="None">
   <transport clientCredentialType="Windows" protectionLevel="EncryptAndSign" />
   <message clientCredentialType="Windows" />
</security>

in the contract. Why?

<system.diagnostics>
    <trace autoflush="true"/>
    <sources>
      <source name="System.ServiceModel" switchValue="Information, ActivityTracing" propagateActivity="true">
        <listeners>
          <add name="sdt" type="System.Diagnostics.XmlWriterTraceListener" initializeData="SdrConfigExample.e2e"/>
        </listeners>
      </source>
    </sources>
  </system.diagnostics>
  <system.serviceModel>
    <behaviors>
      <serviceBehaviors>
        <behavior name="MainService.MyServiceBehavior">
          <serviceMetadata httpGetEnabled="false"/>
          <serviceDebug includeExceptionDetailInFaults="true"/>
        </behavior>
      </serviceBehaviors>
    </behaviors>
    <services>
      <service behaviorConfiguration="MainService.MyServiceBehavior"
        name="MainService.MyService">
        <endpoint address="" binding="netTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration="b1"
          name="NetTcpBindingEndpoint" contract="MainService.IMyService">
          <identity>
            <dns value="175.32.42.53" />
            <servicePrincipalName />
          </identity>
        </endpoint>
        <endpoint address="mex" binding="mexTcpBinding" bindingConfiguration=""
          name="MexTcpBindingEndpoint" contract="IMetadataExchange" />
        <host>
          <baseAddresses>
            <add baseAddress="net.tcp://175.32.42.53:8523/MainService" />
          </baseAddresses>
        </host>
      </service>
    </services>
    <bindings>
      <netTcpBinding>
        <binding name="b1">
          <security mode="Transport">
            <transport clientCredentialType="None"/>
          </security>
        </binding>
      </netTcpBinding>
    </bindings>
  </system.serviceModel>

Any help on how I can get this communication working would be great. I'd rather not add certificates, and have tried entering myself into the active directory of the machine where the server is based, in attempt for WCF service to authenticate itself. Is what I want todo possible with TCPbinding, also with the WCF Test Client.exe tool, or should I just test the WCF service within my seperate C# client app, possibly using impersonation?

share|improve this question
    
WCF doesn't like unencrypted, unprotected data over the wire. Most bindings will default to using Windows credentials to authenticate the caller - as happens in your case. This requires both client and server to be on the same AD domain, however. –  marc_s Jun 13 '11 at 15:45
    
If you cannot use Windows credentials, you need to either just simply secure the transport link (using SSL and HTTPS - requires certificate on the client side) or you at least need to be able to securely identify the service by means of a service-side certificate (so that a secure message exchange can be set up between client and server) –  marc_s Jun 13 '11 at 15:48
1  
If you really insist on tossing out all security, you can define Internet Unsecured Client and Service scenarios - this is however really not recommended.... –  marc_s Jun 13 '11 at 15:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.