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I have a variable that will have the following values:

blah = # 1, 0, or -1

Now I want to set these two variables:

up

down

To either 1 or 0 based on the value of 'blah'.

If blah is 1, then up = 1 and down = 0, if blah is -1 then down = 1 and up = 0

If blah is 0, then both are 0.

How can you do this the ruby way w/o so many if checks?

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1  
Is up ever anything other than 0? –  Jordan Jun 13 '11 at 16:37
    
According to this, up is always 0. Why would up be 0 when blah is 1? Edit @Jordan got there first –  Lee Jarvis Jun 13 '11 at 16:38
    
What is up when blah == -1? What is down when blah == 1? –  sawa Jun 13 '11 at 16:45
    
sorry fixed it above, blah represents the state, so 1 is up, -1 is down. if its 1 then up=1, if its -1 then down=1 –  Blankman Jun 13 '11 at 16:46
1  
Your question is contradictory. How can blah be 0 when it is -1? –  sawa Jun 13 '11 at 16:52
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8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Solution 1

up, down =
case blah
when 1; [1, 0]
when 0; [0, 0]
when -1; [0, 1]
end

Solution 2 (Inspired by mu is too short)

up, down = [[0, 0], [1, 0], [0, 1]][blah]
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@mu is too short Hi again. But isn't blah <=> 0 equal to blah? –  sawa Jun 13 '11 at 17:18
1  
@mu is too short Since blah is also always -1, 0, or 1, I think @sawa is correct. –  Kai Jun 13 '11 at 18:14
    
+1 for the second one. It's what I would have used. Its obscurity disappears after just a second of thinking to remember how an array works. It's going to be very fast. –  the Tin Man Jun 14 '11 at 3:58
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A variant of sawa's and SirDarius's that allows blah to be greater than, less than, or equal to zero rather than just -1, 0, or 1:

def mapper(x)
    h = {
        -1 => [0, 1],
         0 => [0, 0],
         1 => [1, 0]
    }
    h[x <=> 0]
end

up, down = mapper(blah)

Note that Fixnum's <=> operator is specified to return -1, 0, or 1 (or nil of course):

Returns -1, 0, +1 or nil depending on whether fix is less than, equal to, or greater than numeric.

So using <=> is a safe way to implement the signum function for Fixnum.

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I see. I got what you meant. –  sawa Jun 13 '11 at 17:24
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According to your initial specification, the following code worked:

up = 0
down = -blah

EDIT:

Here is a creative way to achieve the desired result using a Hash:

states = { -1 => [0,1], 0 => [0,0], 1 => [1,0] }
up, down = states[blah]
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1  
that's a testament to why a good specification is necessary in software development :) –  SirDarius Jun 13 '11 at 16:40
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up = blah == 1 ? 1 : 0
down = blah == -1 ? 1 : 0
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I don't think this is ruby-specific... something like

up = blah != -1
down = blah != 1

I assume you mean that up should be 1 when blah is 1.

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2  
!= will return boolean, he wants integers –  Lee Jarvis Jun 13 '11 at 16:42
    
Ok, fine; so up = (blah == -1 ? 0 : 1); down = (blah == 1 ? 0 : 1). Although I'm not convinced that he really wants integers... what is the purpose of this exactly? –  Karl Knechtel Jun 13 '11 at 16:43
    
Honestly I wish I knew, he might want integers, but the spec is so vague –  Lee Jarvis Jun 13 '11 at 16:45
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Yet another way to do it:

up, down = [0, blah].max, [0, -blah].max
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Reset both answers to 0 and then adjust as necessary

up, down = 0, 0
up = 1 if blah > 0
down = 1 if blah < 0
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class Integer
  def up?
    self == 1
  end

  def down?
    self == -1
  end
end

x = 1
x.up? # => true
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