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One of the query (given below) is taking 90+ seconds to execute. It returns ~500 rows from a rather large table LogMessage. If ESCAPE N'~' is removed from the query it executes within few seconds. Similarly if TOP (1000) is removed, it executes within few seconds. The query plan shows Key Lookup (Clustered) PK_LogMessage, Index Scan (NonClustered) IX_LogMessage and Nested Loops (Inner Join) in the first case. When the clauses ESCAPE N'~' or TOP (1000) are removed the query plan changes and shows Clustered Index Scan (Clustered) PK_LogMessage. While we are looking into adding more indexes (probably on ApplicationName), we would like to understand what is going on currently.

The query is being generated from Entity Framework in case you wonder why it is being written this way. Also the actual query is more complex but this is the shortest possible version that exhibits the same behavior.

Query:

SELECT TOP (1000) 
    [Project1].[MessageID] AS [MessageID], 
    [Project1].[TimeGenerated] AS [TimeGenerated], 
    [Project1].[SystemName] AS [SystemName], 
    [Project1].[ApplicationName] AS [ApplicationName]
FROM
    (
        SELECT
            [Project1].[MessageID] AS [MessageID],
            [Project1].[TimeGenerated] AS [TimeGenerated],
            [Project1].[SystemName] AS [SystemName],
            [Project1].[ApplicationName] AS [ApplicationName]
        FROM
        (
            SELECT 
                [Extent1].[MessageID] AS [MessageID], 
                [Extent1].[TimeGenerated] AS [TimeGenerated], 
                [Extent1].[SystemName] AS [SystemName], 
                [Extent1].[ApplicationName] AS [ApplicationName]
            FROM
                [dbo].[LogMessage] AS [Extent1]
            INNER JOIN
                [dbo].[LogMessageCategory] AS [Extent2]
            ON
                [Extent1].[CategoryID] = [Extent2].[CategoryID]
            WHERE
                ([Extent1].[ApplicationName] LIKE N'%tier%' ESCAPE N'~')
        )  AS [Project1]
    )  AS [Project1]
ORDER BY
    [Project1].[TimeGenerated] DESC

Table LogMessage:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[LogMessage](
    [MessageID] [int] IDENTITY(1000001,1) NOT NULL,
    [TimeGenerated] [datetime] NOT NULL,
    [SystemName] [nvarchar](256) NOT NULL,
    [ApplicationName] [nvarchar](512) NOT NULL,
        [CategoryID] [int] NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_LogMessage] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [MessageID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF,
    ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON, FILLFACTOR = 90) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[LogMessage]  WITH CHECK ADD CONSTRAINT [FK_LogMessage_LogMessageCategory] FOREIGN KEY([CategoryID])
    REFERENCES [dbo].[LogMessageCategory] ([CategoryID])

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[LogMessage] CHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_LogMessage_LogMessageCategory]

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[LogMessage] ADD  DEFAULT ((100)) FOR [CategoryID]

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [IX_LogMessage] ON [dbo].[LogMessage] 
(
    [TimeGenerated] DESC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF,
    IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON,
    ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON, FILLFACTOR = 90) ON [PRIMARY]

Table LogMessageCategory:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[LogMessageCategory](
    [CategoryID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Name] [nvarchar](128) NOT NULL,
    [Description] [nvarchar](256) NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_LogMessageCategory] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [CategoryID] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

Query Plan 1 (takes 90+ seconds)

Query Plan 1 (takes 90+ seconds)

Query Plan 2 (takes ~3 seconds)

Query Plan 2 (takes ~3 seconds)

share|improve this question
1  
Can you post the exact code for execution plan 1 and 2? The plan does not seem to match the query posted. The query has a join to the LogMessageCategory table but that is not represented in the execution plan (should be an INNER JOIN). Also the LogMessage table does not have a CategoryID. –  8kb Jun 13 '11 at 18:13
    
I'm also confused by the ESCAPE usage. Typically ESCAPE is used to make a wildcard part of the search. For example, you would use LIKE '%50~%%' ESCAPE '~' to search for all strings that contain "50%". But your LIKE statement does not contain a '~' –  8kb Jun 13 '11 at 18:15
    
@8kb, this is the query plan displayed in SQLMS. –  amit_g Jun 13 '11 at 18:34
    
@amit_g: Are you sure? For example, query plan 1 scans the non-clustered index IX_LogMessage and then does a bookmark lookup against the clustered index in LogMessage. That is the inner join in the execution plan. But the query you posted also joins to the LogMessageCategory table. This join is not represented in the execution plan. I noticed this when trying to reproduce the query on my system. If you take out the INNER JOIN to LogMessageCategory, then the query plan matches what you have. –  8kb Jun 13 '11 at 18:40
1  
@David, I want to understand what is going on here. This query is generated by EF and is much more complex than the one I have posted so there is not much we can do to it. The real question is why is it happening. Workarounds are not the problem. We will move the query to stored procedure and call that instead of letting EF generate it. –  amit_g Jun 15 '11 at 16:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This looks like a straight forward parameter sniffing issue to me.

As you want the TOP 1000 ordered by TimeGenerated SQL Server can either scan down the index on TimeGenerated and do lookups against the base table to evaluate the predicate on ApplicationName and stop when row 1,000 has been found or it can do a clustered index scan, find all rows matching the ApplicationName predicate and then do a TOP N sort of these.

SQL Server maintains statistics on string columns. The first plan is more likely to be chosen if it believes that many rows will end up matching the ApplicationName predicate however this plan isn't really suitable for re-use as a parameterised query as it can be catastrophically inefficient in the event that few rows match. If less than 1,000 match it will definitely need to do as many key lookups as there are rows in the table.

From testing this end I wasn't able to find any situation where adding or removing the redundant ESCAPE altered SQL Server's cardinality estimates. Of course changing the text of a parametrised query means that the original plan can't be used however and it needs to compile a different one which will likely be more suited for the specific value under current consideration.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for replying. This query is not in use and also now there are some more indexes on the table so I can't reproduce the exact same plan but the behavior of removing/adding "ESCAPE N'~'" still alters the plan (similar to the one shown above) and the query execution time (again not exactly what is posted above but relatively it is similar). –  amit_g Oct 28 '11 at 22:00

Why all these nested queries?? The code below does the same job

        SELECT TOP(1000)
            [Extent1].[MessageID] AS [MessageID], 
            [Extent1].[TimeGenerated] AS [TimeGenerated], 
            [Extent1].[SystemName] AS [SystemName], 
            [Extent1].[ApplicationName] AS [ApplicationName]
        FROM
            [dbo].[LogMessage] AS [Extent1]
        INNER JOIN
            [dbo].[LogMessageCategory] AS [Extent2]
        ON
            [Extent1].[CategoryID] = [Extent2].[CategoryID]
        WHERE
            ([Extent1].[ApplicationName] LIKE N'%tier%' ESCAPE N'~')
        ORDER BY [Extent1].[TimeGenerated] DESC

Also i agree that ESCAPE N'~' could be ommited as i can find no reason to use it.

share|improve this answer
    
The nested queries are generated by the entity framework, you might not agree with it but it's just the way the entity framework rolls. –  Kane Jun 17 '11 at 10:23
    
that is not the point of this question. The real question is why the SQL Server is doing that kind of plan change and resulting performance with those two clauses. –  amit_g Jun 17 '11 at 16:27
1  
@Kane -- as @niktrs points out, the triple-nested sql is completely unnecessary. If you say that's just how entity framework rolls...that's kind of a sad answer to your own question then -- your problem is entity framework, not SQL-Server. I'd recommend re-tagging your question so you can (hopefully) get some better answers on how to tune EF so it generates better sql -- most importantly, getting rid of the nesting. –  宮本 武蔵 Jul 6 '11 at 15:33
    
@kuru kuru pa - the execution plans shown in the OP indicate that SQL Server does a good job of ignoring the redundant nesting. –  Martin Smith Sep 23 '11 at 9:23

For a start, I would simplify the query as specified by @niktrs. Even though the execution plan seems to be ignoring the sub-queries, it makes it more human friendly and thus easier to manipulate and understand.

Then, you have a INNER JOIN which seems to me like it could go away. Is there a 'real' need for INNER JOIN LogMessage to LogMessageCategory? You can do a quick check by using the following..

SELECT LM.CategoryID AS FromLogMessage, LMC.CategoryID AS FromLogMessageCategory
FROM dbo.LogMessage AS LM
     FULL OUTER JOIN dbo.LogMessageCategory AS LMC ON LMC.CategoryID = LM.CategoryID
WHERE LM.CategoryID IS NULL OR LMC.CategoryID IS NULL
share|improve this answer

How does it run if you do this ?

Select * 
FROM
 (your whole scary framework query with the escape N) a
LIMIT 1000 
(or the mssql alternative if mssql does not support the correct syntax -- )

Because if that rolls .. there's a chance you could keep on using that framework and get decent performance out of really bad sql (like ... this would imply you create the full rs and then only select 1k from it ... ).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for commenting your downvoting ... –  Morg. Sep 23 '11 at 13:02

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