Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this model I'm showing in the admin page:

class Dog(models.Model):
    bark_volume = models.DecimalField(...
    unladen_speed = models.DecimalField(...

    def clean(self):
        if self.bark_volume < 5:
            raise ValidationError("must be louder!")

As you can see I put a validation on the model. But what I want to happen is for the admin page to show the error next to the bark_volume field instead of a general error like it is now. Is there a way to specify which field the validation is failing on?

Much thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

OK, I figured it out from this answer.

You have to do something like this:

class Dog(models.Model):
    bark_volume = models.DecimalField(...
    unladen_speed = models.DecimalField(...

    def clean_fields(self):
        if self.bark_volume < 5:
            raise ValidationError({'bark_volume': ["Must be louder!",]})
share|improve this answer
add comment
class Dog(models.Model):
    bark_volume = models.DecimalField(...
    unladen_speed = models.DecimalField(...

    def clean(self):
        if self.bark_volume < 5:
            if not self._errors.has_key('bark_volume'):
                from django.forms.util import ErrorList
                self._errors['bark_volume'] = ErrorList()
            self._errors['bark_volume'].append('must be louder!')

That works on forms, at least. Never tried it on the model itself, but the methodology should be the same. However, from the Django docs:

When you use a ModelForm, the call to is_valid() will perform these validation steps for all the fields that are included on the form. (See the ModelForm documentation for more information.) You should only need to call a model’s full_clean() method if you plan to handle validation errors yourself, or if you have excluded fields from the ModelForm that require validation.

And...

Note that full_clean() will not be called automatically when you call your model’s save() method, nor as a result of ModelForm validation. You’ll need to call it manually when you want to run model validation outside of a ModelForm.

So, basically, unless you have a really good reason to do field cleaning on the model, you should do it on the form instead. The code for that would look like:

class DogForm(forms.ModelForm):

    def clean(self):
        bark_volume = self.cleaned_data.get('bark_volume')
        if bark_volume < 5:
            if not self._errors.has_key('bark_volume'):
                from django.forms.util import ErrorList
                self._errors['bark_volume'] = ErrorList()
            self._errors['bark_volume'].append('must be louder!')

        return self.cleaned_data

And that will work, for sure.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you also need to raise a ValidationError? or does Django check for self._errors after the clean method is called? –  Ted Jun 13 '11 at 18:35
1  
Actually raising ValidationError merely adds items to self._errors. It is the master list of all errors on the form. –  Chris Pratt Jun 13 '11 at 19:05
    
Using it in the model gives me this error: 'Dog' object has no attribute '_errors' –  Greg Jun 14 '11 at 16:40
    
Okay, then it would appear that you can't use the same methodology. I would suggest doing the validation on your form if it involves multiple fields. That method will work with forms. –  Chris Pratt Jun 15 '11 at 14:17
    
This worked for me in Django 1.6! Thanks. –  joemar.ct Dec 8 '13 at 13:41
add comment

Use a clean_ method that is specific to the field:

class DogForm(forms.ModelForm):
    class Meta:
        model = Dog

    def clean_bark_volume(self):
        if self.cleaned_data['bark_volume'] < 5:
            raise ValidationError("must be louder!")

See the clean<fieldname> part of the Form Validation page. Also, make sure to use cleaned_data instead of the form field itself; the latter may have old data. Finally, do this on the form and not the model.

share|improve this answer
    
First, he was using the clean method on the model not a form. So, there is no cleaned_data in that scenario. Second, clean_FOO is only applicable if you're only validating against that one specific field. If there's multiple fields involved you have to use clean –  Chris Pratt Jun 13 '11 at 19:07
1  
There can be more than one clean_<fieldname> method; each will be checked in turn and their errors will be attached to the relevant fields. –  Mike DeSimone Jun 13 '11 at 20:56
1  
What's the relevance of that? You can't validate multiple fields in one clean_<fieldname> method. There's no guarantee to the availability of the cleaned_data for one field inside the clean method of another. If your validation involves multiple fields you must use clean instead. –  Chris Pratt Jun 14 '11 at 14:25
add comment

The simplest way to validate this particular case would be:

from django.core.validators import MinValueValidator

class Dog(models.Model):
    bark_volume = models.DecimalField(..., validators=[MinValueValidator(5)]

Django's documentation about validators: https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/validators/

share|improve this answer
add comment

To note for anyone that may come across this with a newer version of Django - the clean_fields method from the accepted answer now requires an "exclude" param. Also - I believe the accepted answer is also missing a call to it's super function. The final code that I used was:

def clean_fields(self, exclude=None):
    super(Model, self).clean_fields(exclude)

    if self.field_name and not self.field_name_required:
        raise ValidationError({'field_name_required':["You selected a field, so field_name_required is required"]})
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.