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How do I design a scheme such this in MongoDB? I think there are no foreign keys!

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4  
You're thinking relationally, instead of document-oriented. :P –  Pat Jun 13 '11 at 17:41
5  
Why are you using MongoDB if you want a relational database? –  Adam Robinson Jun 13 '11 at 17:42
10  
:D I'm trying to understand document-oriented method; How can I solve this task? –  Zhirayr Jun 13 '11 at 17:46
1  
What should a document look like in a proper document store then? –  jgauffin Jun 13 '11 at 18:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You may be interested in using a ORM like Mongoid or MongoMapper.

http://mongoid.org/docs/relations/referenced/1-n.html

In a NoSQL database like MongoDB there are not 'tables' but documents. Documents are grouped inside Collections. You can have any kind of document – with any kind of data – in a single collection. Basically, in a NoSQL database it is up to you to decide how to organise the data and its relations, if there are any.

What Mongoid and MongoMapper do is to provide you with convenient methods to set up relations quite easily. Check out the link I gave you and ask any thing.

Edit:

In mongoid you will write your scheme like this:

class Student
  include Mongoid::Document

    field :name
    embeds_many :addresses
    embeds_many :scores    
end

class Address
  include Mongoid::Document

    field :address
    field :city
    field :state
    field :postalCode
    embedded_in :student
end

class Score
  include Mongoid::Document

    belongs_to :course
    field :grade, type: Float
    embedded_in :student
end


class Course
  include Mongoid::Document

  field :name
  has_many :scores  
end

Edit:

> db.foo.insert({group:"phones"})
> db.foo.find()                  
{ "_id" : ObjectId("4df6539ae90592692ccc9940"), "group" : "phones" }
{ "_id" : ObjectId("4df6540fe90592692ccc9941"), "group" : "phones" }
>db.foo.find({'_id':ObjectId("4df6539ae90592692ccc9940")}) 
{ "_id" : ObjectId("4df6539ae90592692ccc9940"), "group" : "phones" }

You can use that ObjectId in order to do relations between documents.

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There are document with items, and I wanna to bind cities. I've create collection with cities, but I don't know how to bind cities with items. PS sorry for my bad english. –  Zhirayr Jun 13 '11 at 17:53
    
@Жирайр Казаросян: Check the edit. –  Nerian Jun 13 '11 at 17:54
    
UPD. I'am using PHP as a programming language, how can I use mongoid, if it is written in Ruby? –  Zhirayr Jun 13 '11 at 17:54
1  
@Жирайр Казаросян: Oh I see :) Being a Ruby developer makes me think only in Ruby :) I am afraid that I do not have experience with PHP and Mongo, but you can check this link: mongodb.org/display/DOCS/… –  Nerian Jun 13 '11 at 17:59
1  
@Жирайр Казаросян: I learned Ruby on Rails with the book Web development with Ruby on Rails, by the pragmatic programmers. You can also get an introduction for free with this screencast codeschool.com/courses/rails-for-zombies –  Nerian Jun 13 '11 at 18:11

How to design table like this in mongodb?

First, to clarify some naming conventions. MongoDB uses collections instead of tables.

I think there are no foreign keys!

Take the following model:

student
{ 
  _id: ObjectId(...),
  name: 'Jane',
  courses: [
    { course: 'bio101', mark: 85 },
    { course: 'chem101', mark: 89 }
  ]
}

course
{
  _id: 'bio101',
  name: 'Biology 101',
  description: 'Introduction to biology'
}

Clearly Jane's course list points to some specific courses. The database does not apply any constraints to the system (i.e.: foreign key contstraints), so there are no "cascading deletes" or "cascading updates". However, the database does contain the correct information.

In addition, MongoDB has a DBRef standard that helps standardize the creation of these references. In fact, if you take a look at that link, it has a similar example.

How can I solve this task?

To be clear, MongoDB is not relational. There is no standard "normal form". You should model your database appropriate to the data you store and the queries you intend to run.

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Ok, but how can I get cource name data from student collection? db.student.find() will return something like courses: [ { course: 'bio101', mark: 85 } ] –  Zhirayr Jun 13 '11 at 18:09
    
@Жирайр Казаросян: > db.foo.find({'_id':ObjectId("4df6539ae90592692ccc9940")}) -------------> { "_id" : ObjectId("4df6539ae90592692ccc9940"), "group" : "phones" } –  Nerian Jun 13 '11 at 18:22

From The Little MongoDB Book

Yet another alternative to using joins is to denormalize your data. Historically, denormalization was reserved for performance-sensitive code, or when data should be snapshotted (like in an audit log). However, with the ever- growing popularity of NoSQL, many of which don’t have joins, denormalization as part of normal modeling is becoming increasingly common. This doesn’t mean you should duplicate every piece of information in every document. However, rather than letting fear of duplicate data drive your design decisions, consider modeling your data based on what information belongs to what document.

So,

student
{ 
    _id: ObjectId(...),
    name: 'Jane',
    courses: [
    { 
        name: 'Biology 101', 
        mark: 85, 
        id:bio101 
    },
  ]
}

If its a RESTful API data, replace the course id with a GET link to the course resource

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