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I'm looking to simply pull some quoted text out of a function call and was wondering if I could get some help with regex?

The string would look something like this: 'MyFunction("MyStringArg");'

I would, essentially, like to scan a file for any lines that call 'MyFunction', and then capture the string literal within the quotes.

Follow-up Question
How would I go about avoiding commented lines with this?

Update
I was able to solve my problem with:
MyFunction\s*\(\s*"(.*?)\"\s*\)\s*;

Thanks @devyndraen and everyone for your help!

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1  
What if the string MyFunction("...") occurs inside a string literal, or inside a comment? –  Bart Kiers Jun 13 '11 at 18:14
2  
Good luck. Function call syntax isn't regular :-) –  Platinum Azure Jun 13 '11 at 18:14
1  
What language are you examining? –  Gumbo Jun 13 '11 at 18:17
    
@Platinum Azure, while I'm not saying this problem should be tackled by regex, but most regex-implementations can match more than regular languages. Besides, there's no such thing as a universal "Function call syntax": perhaps the OP is parsing/matching some home-grown DSL that is regular. –  Bart Kiers Jun 13 '11 at 18:23
1  
I think the OP is using regex in the Right Way (tm) as in to solve a one-off problem, not putting this into production code. So a 95% solution is probably good enough. –  MK. Jun 13 '11 at 18:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm not sure what kinds of requirements for formatting you have, so I included the assumption that there could be any amount of space in the normal programming places there could be some.

The resultant string will be in the \1 backreference.

MyFunction\s*\(\s*"(.*?)\"\s*\)\s*;

http://rubular.com/r/qVsaqJS6gJ

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I would suggest this non-greedy regex with flag s (DOTALL in Java) (assuming there are no comments inside the parenthesis of this function call:

$regex = '/MyFunction.*?\(.*?"(.*?)".*?\).*?;/s';

If you use preg_match($regex, $str, $matches) then argument will be available in $matches[1].

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To compensate for commented lines or blocks, you'd first need to filter the file to remove all comments before you apply the regex. For PHP, you could use the following:



$example='
line 1
line 2 // comment 1
line 3 # comment 2
// comment 3.1
# comment 3.2
/*
   comment 4.1
   comment 4.2
*/
line 9 /* comment 5.1
comment 5.2
*/';

echo '<h3>Example Text</h3><pre>'.$example.'</pre><hr>';

$regex='/
    (?x)
    (?:
        # single-line inline comments beginning at col#1
        (?s)
        (?:\\/\\/|\\#)
        [^\\n]+
        \\n
    |
        # single-line inline comments beginning after col#1 
        # preserve leading content
        (?m)
        ^
        (.+?)
        (?:\\/\\/|\\#)
        .*?
        $
    |
        # multi-line comments
        (?s)
        \\/
        \\*
            (?:.|\\n)*?
        \\*
        \\/
    )
/x';

echo '<h3>Regular Expression</h3><pre>'.$regex.'</pre><hr>';

$result=preg_replace( $regex, '$1', $example);

echo '<h3>Result</h3><pre>'.$result.'</pre><hr>';

which produces:


Example Text

line 1
line 2 // comment 1
line 3 # comment 2
// comment 3.1
# comment 3.2
/*
   comment 4.1
   comment 4.2
*/
line 9 /* comment 5.1
comment 5.2
*/

Regular Expression

/
    (?x)
    (?:
        # single-line inline comments beginning at col#1
        (?s)
        (?:\/\/|\#)
        [^\n]+
        \n
    |
        # single-line inline comments beginning after col#1 
        # preserve leading content
        (?m)
        ^
        (.+?)
        (?:\/\/|\#)
        .*?
        $
    |
        # multi-line comments
        (?s)
        \/
        \*
            (?:.|\n)*?
        \*
        \/
    )
/x

Result

line 1
line 2 
line 3 

line 9
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[^(]*("([^"]*)")

and then group number 1 will be the string in quotes. You'll have to enquote it again yourself though.

(this is not highly scientific, as in it is likely to pick up some things that you don't want)

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MK, <source> tags do nothing. See: stackoverflow.com/editing-help –  Bart Kiers Jun 13 '11 at 18:17
    
@Bart oops, thanks. Confused with wiki :) –  MK. Jun 13 '11 at 18:18
1  
@MK, 1. You need to escape the beginning and ending parentheses which appear just before and after their respective double-quotes by adding backslashes. This is universally supported and not dependent on any regex engine I know of and is critical for your solution to succeed. 2. Your solution will return an empty result for empty strings (i.e. "") which will require filtering after the fact to find useful results. 3. And finally, your solution as presented will match all of the following strings: '("")', 'foo""', '""' which isn't at all what the OP requires. –  Rob Raisch Jun 13 '11 at 20:31
1  
@MK, further your use of '[^(]*' is a no-op in that it will match zero or more non-left-parens. –  Rob Raisch Jun 13 '11 at 20:33
1  
@MK, It occurs to me that if your solution assumes Unix-shell or Vi(m) style regular expressions, you do not need to escape the internal set of parentheses but then, you need to escape the outer-pair to make them capturing. (Besides, shell or vi style regexs are a very special case and won't work in any other environments, so using them as your solution is questionable.) –  Rob Raisch Jun 13 '11 at 20:37

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