Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a cache I want to periodically check and prune. In Java, I'd do the following:

new Thread(new Runnable() {
  void run() {
    while (true) { 
      Thread.sleep(1000);
      // clear the cache's old entries
    }
  }
}).start();

Sure, I'd have some issues with thread-safe types to use as the cache, but putting that aside, my question is simple. What's the Scala way of running a recurring background task -- something you don't want running in the application's main thread?

I've used actors a bit and I guess my problem in this scenario is that I don't have anything to generate a message that it's time to clear the cache. Or rather, the only way I can imagine to generate those messages is to create a thread to do it...

EDIT: I need people to vote on answers -- they all look good to me

share|improve this question
2  
Thread spawning greatly depends on your system. It maybe to costly for you to have a thread for each such case. Take a look at ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor, you can used it from Scala with some helpers defined in scala.concurrent package –  tuxSlayer Jun 14 '11 at 13:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 18 down vote accepted

There are many ways to do that, but I would do something simple like the following.

import scala.concurrent.ops._

spawn {
  while (true) { 
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    // clear the cache's old entries
  }
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
5  
.. and make sure you handle exceptions –  Sam Stainsby Jun 13 '11 at 22:46
    
I'm gonna go with this one, because I want a new thread in this case. –  Jeb Jun 14 '11 at 16:14
6  
scala.concurrent.ops object is now deprecated (Since version 2.10.0). –  Naetmul Jan 11 at 7:28
    
@Naetmul, and what should be used instead? –  Alexander Supertramp Mar 17 at 6:05
1  
@Alex From the docs: Use Future instead. –  Kai Sellgren Mar 18 at 10:55

You could use Akka Scheduler, which allows you to send a reccuring message to an (akka) actor doing the job. From the doc, just use:

import akka.actor.Scheduler

//Sends messageToBeSent to receiverActor after initialDelayBeforeSending and then after each delayBetweenMessages
Scheduler.schedule(receiverActor, messageToBeSent, initialDelayBeforeSending, delayBetweenMessages, timeUnit)
share|improve this answer
    
I think that is code for early versions of Akka; to do the same thing with more recent versions, see doc.akka.io/docs/akka/current/java/scheduler.html –  Jon Jan 20 at 6:31

Futures is a simple way to do it without explicitly starting a new thread

import scala.actors.Futures._

// main thread code here

future {
   // second thread code here
}

// main thread code here
share|improve this answer
9  
Futures are designed for one time tasks not recurring tasks. The overhead is significant and unnecessary for a recurring task. –  Rex Kerr Jun 14 '11 at 13:35
    
He clearly stated 'recurring'. There's nothing on recurring in your sample. Sorry, -1 –  akauppi Mar 28 '13 at 13:33
2  
@RexKerr: But the deprecation information regarding the accepted answer based on spawn gives the direction to replace spawn by a future. So what is the correct answer for Scala 2.10? @Jus12: To make this work one may have to import scala.concurrent.ExecutionContext.Implicits.global. @akauppi: I would accept a while (true) { ... } in the future to somehow fulfill recurring... –  bluenote10 Mar 12 at 16:05
1  
@RexKerr: I was expecting that both approaches are technically equivalent and in this case one might argue that the syntactical simplification is a big advantage. I guess you favor the old-fashioned way for technical reasons (which I was not aware of)... –  bluenote10 Mar 12 at 18:15
1  
@bluenote10 - Futures generally run on thread pools that do not scale to the size of all available threads, and have additional overhead. When choosing between a more expensive solution that uses a more limited resource, and less expensive one that uses a less limited resource, I tend to choose the less limited one. –  Rex Kerr Mar 12 at 21:35

With Actors without tying up a thread:

import actors.{TIMEOUT, Actor}
import actors.Actor._

private case class Ping( client: Actor, update: Int )
private case class Pulse()
case class Subscribe( actor: Actor )
case class Unsubscribe( actor: Actor )

class PulseActor extends Actor {
  def act = eventloop {
        case ping: Ping => { sleep(ping.update); ping.client ! Pulse }
  }
  def sleep(millis: Long) =
    receiveWithin(millis) {
      case TIMEOUT =>
  }
}

class ServiceActor extends Actor {

  var observers: Set[Actor] = Set.empty
  val pulseactor = new PulseActor
  val update = 2000

  def act = {
    pulseactor.start
    pulseactor ! new Ping( this, update )
    loop {
      react {
        case sub: Subscribe => observers += sub.actor
        case unsub: Unsubscribe => observers -= unsub.actor
        case Pulse => pulse
      }
    }
  }


  def pulse {  
    //cpuload = CPUprofile.getCPUload.getOrElse{ List(0.0) }  //real work
    observers foreach { observer => observer ! "CPUloadReport( cpuload )" }
    pulseactor ! Ping(this, update)
  }
}

object Exercise extends App {
  val deamon = new ServiceActor
  deamon.start
}
share|improve this answer

spawn is good but note that your sample code works in Scala too:

new Thread(new Runnable() {
  override def run() {
    while (true) { 
      Thread.sleep(1000);
      // clear the cache's old entries
    }
  }
}).start();

Just clean it up with an implicit conversion:

implicit def funcToRunnable(f: => ()) = new Runnable() { override def run() { f() } }

new Thread{
  while(true) {
    Thread.sleep(1000);
    // blah
  }
}.start()
share|improve this answer
    
In my test (Scala 2.10.3) the implicit version is blocking, but the first is not. –  user445107 Jun 30 at 18:51
    
@davips Are you sure that the f parameter to funcToRunnable is lazy? –  Bill Jun 30 at 19:19
    
Intellij was complaining about f: => () so I put f: => Unit. Should be there any difference? –  user445107 Jul 1 at 9:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.