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What I want to do is to sending data between two handlers.

element.onmousedown = function() {
    data = precalculate();
}

element.onmouseup = function() {
    dosomething(data);
}

if the data is a global variable it works. People says global variable is evil. But I don't know how to do without it.

or I misunderstood "global variable"?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just scope the variable if you don't want/need it to be global:

(function() {
    var data;
    element.onmousedown = function() {
        data = precalculate();
    }

    element.onmouseup = function() {
        dosomething(data);
    }
})();

EDIT: To clarify, the only way to create a new variable scope in javascript is in a function.

Any variable declared with var inside a function is inaccessible to the outer scope.

In the code above, I created an IIFE (immediately invoked function expression), which is simply a function that is invoked as soon as it is created, and I placed your data variable (along with the handler assignments) inside of it.

Because the handlers were created in a scope that has access to the data variable, they retain their access to that variable.

To give another example:

var a = "a"; // global variable

(function() {

    var b = "b";  // new variable in this scope

    (function() {

        var c = "c";  // new variable in this scope

        // in this function, you have access to 'a', 'b' and 'c'

    })();

    // in this function you have access to 'a' and 'b' variables, but not 'c'

})();

// globally, you have access to the 'a' variable, but not 'b' or 'c'
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This is what I want to know. –  Lai Yu-Hsuan Jun 13 '11 at 19:27
    
@Lai: Glad I could help. I added another variable scope example. –  user113716 Jun 13 '11 at 19:33

In this case a global variable would make sense. Another possibility is to attach the value to the DOM element:

element.onmousedown = function() {
    // 'this' should point to the element being mouse downed
    this.data = precalculate(); 
};

element.onmouseup = function() {
    // 'this' should point to the element being mouse upped
    var data = this.data;
    dosomething(data);
};
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You misunderstood "global variable is evil".

In fact, what really happened is that someone wanted to be "part of the crowd", and so told you a sweeping generalisation, when in fact they should have said "only use global variables where appropriate".

Well, they are appropriate here, my friend.

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1  
All sweeping generalizations are evil! ;o) –  user113716 Jun 13 '11 at 19:21

JQuery makes this possible by using the .data() function:

http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.data/

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There's no indication that jQuery is being used here. –  user113716 Jun 13 '11 at 19:20
    
I was offering a solution. –  kinakuta Jun 13 '11 at 20:40
    
@user: Just that it doesn't make sense to load an entire library for the sake of a single need that is easily remedied within the language itself. –  user113716 Jun 13 '11 at 21:34
    
I think that's a valid point. If the solution isn't a good one, don't vote for it. But the user didn't specifically say no jquery. –  kinakuta Jun 13 '11 at 21:49
    
@user: Yes, and I didn't vote it up or down. Just thought it was worth a comment. jQuery can be a great solution, but not always. –  user113716 Jun 13 '11 at 22:04

You can get away with using global variables as long as you keep them to a minimum, for example you can place stuff in a single global namespace:

App = {};

element.onmousedown = function() {
   App.data = "hello";
}

element.onmouseup = function() {
   console.log(App.data);
}
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Another more general solution is to create functions that cache their results using a technique that is called memoization. There's plenty of stuff if you search. The following code does exactly that :

Function.prototype.memoize = function() {
    var fn = this;
    this.memory = {};
    return function() {
        var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
        return fn.memory[args] ? fn.memory[args] : fn.memory[args] = fn.apply(this, arguments);
    };
};

e.g. You have an expensive function called exfunc..

newFunc = exfunc.memoize();

The above statement creates a new function called newFunc that caches the result of the original function so that the first time the actual code is being executed and all subsequent calls are retrieved from a local cache.

This mostly works with functions whose return value does not depend on global state.

More info : http://osteele.com/archives/2006/04/javascript-memoization

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