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I'm trying to create a chaining function for working with strings that are returned from an XML file.

1 original string may have multiple replacements, some of which come from the XML file.

Here is the ugly and standard wrapped approach:

str_replace("what","is meant", str_replace("name","randomer",str_replace("blah", "hello", $string1)));

Here is the approach I'm trying to replicate (like Java):

$string1.replace("blah","hello").replace("name","randomer").replace("what","is meant");

With the above, it works easily... until I use the XML function to get the replacing string.

Here's my class:

class resources{

private static $instance, $string;

public static function getString($stringName){
    # Create new instance
    self::$instance = new self;

    # Grabs stringName from an XML file
    self::$string = $stringName;

    # Return instance
    var_dump(self::$instance);
    return self::$instance;

}

public static function replace($replace_this, $with_this){
    # Replace and return instance
    self::$string = str_replace($replace_this, $with_this, self::$string);
    return self::$instance;
}

public static function show(){
    # Return String
    return self::$string;
}

}

echo resources::getString("alpha") // alpha
    ->replace("lpha","bravo") // abravo
    ->replace("vo", resources::getString("charlie")->show()) // should be abracharlie
 ->show(); // charlie

I'd like it to understand why it's not working as I think it should and how it should actually work. It seems that when I call the class again (despite var_dump saying its a seperate instance), it replaces the original text with "charlie" so I can't just replace a part of the first bit.

Thanks, Dominic

EDIT: Yes!! I have figured it out (using statics) but it seems Ryano below has an even better solution

<?php

class resources{
private static $instance, $string, $originalString;

public static function getInstance($stringName){
    self::$instance = new self();
    self::$originalString = $stringName;
    return self::$instance;
}

public static function getString($stringName){
    # Grabs stringName from an XML file
    self::$string = $stringName;
    return self::$instance;
}

function replace($replace_this, $with_this){
    self::$originalString = str_replace($replace_this, $with_this, self::$originalString);
    self::$string = self::$originalString;
    return self::$instance;
}

function show(){
    return self::$string;
}

}

echo resources::getInstance("alpha") // alpha
    ->replace("lpha","bravo") // abravo
    ->replace("vo", resources::getString("charlie")->show()) // should be abracharlie
    ->replace("lie", resources::getString("vo")->show()) // abracharvo
    ->show(); // abracharvo

echo "<br />";

echo resources::getInstance("randomer") // randomer
    ->replace("er","") //  random
    ->replace("ran", resources::getString("")->show()) // dom
    ->replace("dom", resources::getString("Dom")->show()) // Dom
    ->show(); // Dom

echo "<br />";

echo resources::getInstance("nomster") // nomster
    ->replace("nom","nmo") //  nmoster
    ->replace("nom", resources::getString("mon")->show()) // nmoster
    ->replace("nmo", resources::getString("mon")->show()) // monster
    ->show(); // monster

?>
share|improve this question
    
Why static methods? –  Hamish Jun 13 '11 at 21:12
    
I assume you looked at some bad design pattern advise. Get rid of all the static and self:: stuff and use $this-> in its place. And give that class a proper name ("mystrings") if that's what it deals with. –  mario Jun 13 '11 at 21:15
    
The static methods were an attempt to keep each object within it's own scope but it doesn't seem to work. I did originally have it like you say but that didn't work either so was trying multiple things. Resources is a bad name in its simple form but I've stripped a lot of the code to try and get the basic functionality working –  Dominic Watson Jun 13 '11 at 21:37
    
Your "working" version doesn't work if you nest more than 2 levels. Try resources::getInstance("nomster")->replace('nom', resources::getInstance("mon")->replace("o", resources::getInstance('bob')->show())->show())->show(). This will return bb when it should return mbobnster. –  Glenn Moss Jun 13 '11 at 22:40
    
That's because you're calling getInstance within the replace method. You call getInstance only the first time so that the class can be used multiple times on the same page. If you copy and paste my example it works 100%. I'm going to have a look at what you also posted below as I'm sure I'm about to learn something :D –  Dominic Watson Jun 13 '11 at 22:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem is that everything is static. I would suggest brushing up on some object-oriented programming fundamentals.

Because everything is static, the state is shared between all invocations of the functions. In the line replace("vo", resources::getString("charlie")->show()), the nested call to resources::getString replaces the string built so far (abravo) with the argument to getString which is charlie. Then the wrapping function is called like replace("vo", "charlie"), but the value of self::$string is now charlie, which does not contain vo and therefore the final show() then returns simply charlie. If, instead of vo, you'd called it with replace("ar", resources::getString("charlie")->show()), the final show() would have instead returned chcharlielie.

You must create a class with non-static member variables and methods in order to maintain separate states.

Here's a working version:

class resources {

  private $string;

  public function __construct ($string) {
    $this->string = $string;
  }

  public static function getString ($string) {
    $obj = new resources($string);

    return $obj;
  }

  public function replace ($replace_this, $with_this) {
    # Replace and return instance
    $this->string = str_replace($replace_this, $with_this, $this->string);
    return $this;
  }

  public function show () {
    # Return String
    return $this->string;
  }

}

Edit: I like the above code as the closest transition from the question's code. If I was writing something similar myself, I would simplify it further like this:

class Str {
    private $str;

    private function __construct ($str) {
      $this->str = $str;
    }

    public static function with ($str) {
        return new Str($str);
    }

    public function replace($replace_this, $with_this) {
      $this->str = str_replace($replace_this, $with_this, $this->str);
      return $this;
    }

    public function __toString () {
      return $this->str;
    }
}

echo Str::with('nomster')->replace('nom', 'mon') . "\n";

Now there's no need for show() and the names are a little nicer to type. Many other useful methods could be added here; any php string function you would want to chain.

share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't using static things first, I had something closer to this but it never worked and I never understood why... Will have to compare to my very first version and see what exactly I was doing wrong :D My working code above does work but it's nowhere near as simple and nice as this (and took me about 10 hours to reach)... I had to use a getInstance function at the start of every string and use a load of statics. Thanks so much for this answer :) –  Dominic Watson Jun 13 '11 at 22:58
    
Just tested your latest iteration of code and its much better without having to call the last ->show() function at the end of them all. Was only there originally because I wasn't sure how to print it out on its own last time. Thanks, I now know why I couldn't get it working the first time. –  Dominic Watson Jun 15 '11 at 10:28

When you call getString() several times, you create several instances since you call new self() in getString().

To prevent that from happening you should create a method getInstance() and use that in getString()

public static function getInstance() {
    if(!self::instance) {
        self::instance = new self();
    }
    return self::instance;
}

public static function getString() {
    $instance = self::getInstance();

    // use $instance here instead of self::instance
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm purposely creating multiple instances to attempt to keep the scope of each usage to itself... I have multiple objects but they're still overriding one another for some reason :/ –  Dominic Watson Jun 13 '11 at 21:32
    
Then you should (imo) not use static methods that create object, but instead first create your objects and then use non-static methods. Method names should be selfexplaining, at least for the most part. Nobody (not even you in two months) expects a static method getString() to return a new instance. –  Arjan Jun 13 '11 at 21:47
    
I see your point about naming it how it is, thanks :) –  Dominic Watson Jun 13 '11 at 22:24
    
This is the singleton pattern and is not the answer here. –  Glenn Moss Jun 13 '11 at 22:27

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