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#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

void RevStr (char *str)
{   
    if(*str !=0)
    {
        vector<char> v1;

        while((*str != ' ')&&(*str !=0))
            v1.push_back(*str++);
        // trying to not add space in the last word of string
        if(*str !=0)
        {
            v1.push_back(' ');
            str++;
        }
        RevStr(str);
        cout<<*str;
    }


}
int main()
{
    RevStr("hello world!");
    cout<<endl;

}

I want to change the order of words in the string for example " how are you" => "you are how"

I am having some problem, its not printing correctly (print only w), please help me and tell me what i did wrong. However i know that I should not call "cout<<*str; " since i am inserting the "array of char" in stack (recurssion) but i dont know what i need to do.

share|improve this question
    
Welcome! Please read the FAQ to learn more about StackOverflow. Also, please remember to format code before posting (I formatted it for you this time). – Jacob Jun 13 '11 at 21:13
5  
If this is C++, why use char * strings? C++ has a perfectly usable std::string. C and C++ are two very different languages with some overlap, and writing C with C++ features gets you bad C++. – David Thornley Jun 13 '11 at 21:22
    
At least for the some definition of "word", operator>> for std::string will read one word into a string. Combine with a std::vector<std::string> and rbegin()/rend() and things are pretty easy... – Jerry Coffin Jun 13 '11 at 21:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You're losing the "hello" part.

The algorithm you seem to go for does this:

  1. each call to RevStr isolates the first word in the string it is passed as a parameter
  2. calls RevStr with the remaining of the string
  3. prints the word it isolated at step 1 as the stack unwinds

Basically, you should be printing the v1 data.

share|improve this answer

A common approach to do this is to reverse the entire string first, then for each word, reverse the letters in the word. So no recursion is necessary. You might find it easier to give this a try (yes, I know this isn't exactly an answer to your question :) ).

share|improve this answer

C++ makes it simple:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>

std::string reverse(std::string const& text)
{
    std::stringstream           inStream(text);
    std::stringstream           outStream;
    std::vector<std::string>    words;

    std::copy(std::istream_iterator<std::string>(inStream), std::istream_iterator<std::string>(), std::back_inserter(words));
    std::copy(words.rbegin(), words.rend(), std::ostream_iterator<std::string>(outStream, " "));
    return outStream.str();
}


int main()
{
    std::cout << reverse("Hello World") << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Only problem with this, is it won't preserve whitespace, not that there were rules given about how to do that – Keith Nicholas Jun 13 '11 at 22:48

Use cout << str, not cout << *str to print a string. There's an operator<< overload for char *. But maybe that's not what you're trying to do; I can't quite follow your logic, in any event.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks , i thought i did it, i am sorry – Alok Jun 13 '11 at 21:14
    
My logic is that "I am trying to read each word (until find space) call the – Alok Jun 13 '11 at 21:17
    
yes you r right, but what do i need to do in the code? v1 is defined as local so its value will be lost when it come out from the innerloops – Alok Jun 13 '11 at 21:25
    
I think you mean for this to be a comment on @Andrei's answer, but I'll answer it anyway: you can pass v1 from one level of recursion to the next by returning it from the function. Each call could return the word that should be printed; they'll be printed in reverse order. – Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 13 '11 at 21:37

I would strongly advise making using some of the functionality exposed via std::string as a place to start.

One way you might do this would look like this:

std::string ReverseString(std::string s)
{
    std::stack<std::string > stack;
    std::string tmpstr = "";
    std::string newstr = "";
    size_t strsize = s.size();
    size_t pos  = 0;   size_t tmppos = 0;
    size_t i = 0;      size_t stacksize = 0;
    while( pos < strsize )
    {
        tmppos = s.find(" ", pos, 1);    // starting as pos, look for " "
        if (tmppos == std::string::npos) // std::string::npos => reached end
        {
            tmppos = strsize;            // don't forget the last item.
        }     
        tmpstr = s.substr(pos, tmppos-pos); // split the string.
        stack.push(tmpstr);                 // push said string onto the stack
        pos = tmppos+1;
    }
    stacksize = stack.size();
    for ( i = 0; i < stacksize; i++ )
    {
        tmpstr = stack.top();              // grab string from top of the stack
        stack.pop();                       // stacks being LIFO, we're getting 
        if ( i != 0 )                      // everything backwards.
        {
            newstr.append(" ");            // add preceding whitespace.
        }
        newstr.append(tmpstr);             // append word.
    }
    return newstr;
}

It's by no means the best or fastest way to achieve this; there are many other ways you could do it (Jerry Coffin mentions using std::vector with an iterator, for example), but as you have the power of C++ there, to me it would make sense to use it.

I've done it this way so you could use a different delimiter if you wanted to.

In case you're interested, you can now use this with:

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    std::string s = "In Soviet Russia String Format You";
    std::string t = ReverseString(s);
    std::cout << t << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would strongly advice following your own advice :-) <quote>full use of the standard C++ library</quote> – Loki Astari Jun 13 '11 at 22:06
    
It's intended to be readable and not so far from what the OP has already done/is probably thinking, as a hint to think in terms of "what can the STL help me do?". Full use was the wrong phrase to use in the context of the sample I provided though, so I've fixed that. As I said, <quote>it's by no means the best or fastest way</quote>. – user257111 Jun 13 '11 at 22:47

given that its a char*, this reverses it inplace (ie, doesn't require more memory proportional to the incoming 'str'). This avoids converting it to a std::string ( not that its a bad idea to, just because it's a char* to start with.)

void reverse_words(char* str)
{
    char* last = strlen(str) + str;
    char *s, *e;
    std::reverse(str,last);
    for(s=e=str; e != last; e++)
    {
        if(*e == ' ') 
        {
            std::reverse(s,e);
            s = e+1;
        }
    }
    std::reverse(s,e);  
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for all ur help – Alok Jun 14 '11 at 16:32
void Reverse(const string& text)
{
    list<string> words;
    string temp;
    for ( auto cur = text.begin(); cur != text.end(); ++cur)
    {
        if (*cur == ' ')
        {
            words.push_front(temp);
            temp.clear();
        }
        else
        {
            temp += *cur;
        }
    }
    if (! temp.empty())
    {
        words.push_front(temp);
    }

    for_each(words.begin(), words.end(), [](const string& word) { cout << word << " "; });
    cout << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
void swap(char* c1, char* c2) {
    char tmp = *c1;
    *c1 = *c2;
    *c2 = tmp;
}

void reverse(char* s, char* e) {
     if (s == NULL || e == NULL)
        return;
     while(s < e)
      swap(s++, e--);
}

void reverse_words(char* line) {
  if (line == NULL)
    return; 
  reverse(line, line+strlen(line)-1);
  char *s = line;
  char *e;
  while (*s != '\0') {
    e = s;
    while (*e != ' ' && *e != '\0') ++e;
    --e;
    reverse(s,e);
    s = e+2;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

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