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So I'm doing a an ajax call in this function somewhat like this:

function getCount() {
  $.get("/People/getCount", function (data) {
    if (data && data != "") { 
      // lots of code in here
      }

What I'm doing in another function is making a second call like this:

function worldPeople() {
    return $.get("/People/getCount", function (data) {
     if (data != 0) {
        var target = $("#worldNumbers").find("span");
        target.html(data.length).digits();

     }
  })
}

So I really would like to avoid making that second call. Is there any good way in avoiding that? Maybe do some chaining or such, reusing the callback from the first one? I've heard that its bad practice to do several calls. Regards

Would like to thank all who answered. In the end did not use any of the solutions, I solved it in another way. I'm sure most of the examples you gave me were really good. Do not know how to do with accepting answers. Accept all or none?! Thanks!

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5 Answers

You could create a simple data store:

App.store = function () {
    this.people = null;
    this.count
    loadPeople = function () {
         if(this.people === null) {
          $.get("/People/getCount", function (data) {
          if (data != 0) {
               this.count = (data.length).digits();
               this.people = data;
           }
         }
    };
} 
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What about store count of peoples in hidden field? And than check this field before sending request.

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Interesting approach. So I guess doing that in conjunction with the first function? –  Tim Jun 13 '11 at 21:51
    
@Tim: I guess in both. So, first executed function loading count and saving result, second just reading hidden field. –  Andrew Orsich Jun 13 '11 at 21:55
    
That's what I meant :) . One thing though, is this a "safe" procedure? Meaning storing data in hidden fields. I might add that I will be dealing with large amounts of data. –  Tim Jun 13 '11 at 21:59
    
@Tim: Hmm , why large amount of data? Seems we are speaking about one int field. Storing anything private in html, javascript unsafe by default. –  Andrew Orsich Jun 13 '11 at 22:04
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You can achieve this by handling your Ajax requests using some sort of cache. I use a cache that saves the information retrieved based on the url it called. If another function sets off the same request the cache returns the alraedy fetched data.

What you do need to do as well though is check if the data is outdated so you can refetch it if necessary.

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Are you referring to ajaxQueue? –  Tim Jun 13 '11 at 21:52
    
No. I was referring to the general idea of a client-side cache. For my own purpose I have implemented one in raw javascript and teamed it up with an ajax class. If you wanted to use this with jquery you could just call your cache retrieve method and there check if you have data, otherwise call it using your jquery ajax request. –  Dan Jun 13 '11 at 21:56
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Well, you can just send the function pointer to the function that executes $.get

basically you would then do this:

function worldPeople() {
    getCountFromServer(function(data){
        //do sth with data
    });
}

function getCount() {
    getCountFromServer(function(data){
          //do sth with data
    });
}

function getCountFromServer(callback) {
    return $.get("/People/getCount", function (data) {
        if (data)
            callback(data);
    });
}
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Yes that's more or less what I was looking for. I'm tired now so I might be missing the part of function test()? In this case it is function getCount() I presume? –  Tim Jun 13 '11 at 21:48
    
I updated text with more logic make things clearer. Don't forget that this approach cleans up your code, but does not solve caching issue - you will have two calls towards server. –  Milan Aleksic Jun 13 '11 at 21:53
    
Ok I get it now. Thanks for your answer. –  Tim Jun 13 '11 at 21:54
    
Yes I was just going to say that. It looks good and all but still my problem with two calls remains. –  Tim Jun 13 '11 at 21:55
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I generally use a caching module pattern for this kind of thing:

// create a quick singleton to store cached data
var People = (function() {
    // private variable to act as cache
    var count;

    // function to get cached data
    // note: You have to assume it's always asynchronous
    function getCount(callback) {
        // have we loaded the data yet?
        if (count===undefined) {
            // cache miss: load the data, store it, do the callback
            $.get("/People/getCount", function (data) {
                count = data;
                callback(data);
            }
        } else {
            // cache hit - no need to reload
            callback(count);
        }
    }

    // provide access to the getter function
    return {
        getCount: getCount
    };

}());

The first time you hit the cache, it'll load from the server; the second time it will load from the private variable.

// will load the data asynchronously
People.getCount(function(count) {
    alert("First hit: " + count);
});

// will use the cached data
People.getCount(function(count) {
    alert("Second hit: " + count);
});

Depending on the complexity you want to support, you could add additional features like expiring the cache after a particular interval, caching multiple calls (potentially keyed to the AJAX URL), etc. I like to keep the API simple and not reference the AJAX URLs - that way your cache acts like an abstracted service layer, and you can create other cache implementation to work with different data sources - useful for things like stubbing out data before you've implemented your server-side AJAX handlers.

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Really nice example. Though you are referring to getCount() two times? People.getCount(function (count)) <-- –  Tim Jun 13 '11 at 22:07
    
@Tim - not sure what you mean. The .getCount() function has to take a callback as an argument, rather than just returning the value, because the response might be asynchronous. In my example, which is not the way you'd usually do it, I called .getCount() twice in a row, just to show that the second time it would probably be using cached data. –  nrabinowitz Jun 13 '11 at 22:37
    
(though come to think of it, if you actually called it twice in a row like this, you might call the second function before the AJAX call had returned, which would still result in two AJAX calls - hard to avoid this, however, without heavily-nested callback functions.) –  nrabinowitz Jun 13 '11 at 22:38
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