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my question is simple: "how to build a dynamic growing truth table in python in an elegant way?"

for n=3

for p in False, True:
    for q in False, True:
        for r in False, True:
            print '|{0} | {1} | {2} |'.format(int(p),int(q), int(r))

for n=4

for p in False, True:
    for q in False, True:
        for r in False, True:
            for s in False, True:
                print '|{0} | {1} | {2} | {3}'.format(int(p),int(q), int(r), int(s))

I would like to have a function which takes n as a parameter and builds up the table, it is not necessary to print the table, returning a datastructure representing the table is fine also.

many thanks in advance.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Use itertools.product():

table = list(itertools.product([False, True], repeat=n))

Result for n = 3:

[(False, False, False),
 (False, False, True),
 (False, True, False),
 (False, True, True),
 (True, False, False),
 (True, False, True),
 (True, True, False),
 (True, True, True)]
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1  
this is beautiful. –  Nobita Jun 13 '11 at 21:15
    
this is they way to go indeed. Thank you all for the answers. I will do it like here described, but the implementations under here are worth to look at and to vote up! –  evildead Jun 13 '11 at 22:36

List comprehensions are, of course, more Pythonic.

def truthtable (n):
  if n < 1:
    return [[]]
  subtable = truthtable(n-1)
  return [ row + [v] for row in subtable for v in [0,1] ]

Results, indented for clairity:

truthtable(1)
[ [0],
  [1] ]

truthtable(3)
[ [0, 0, 0],
  [0, 0, 1],
  [0, 1, 0],
  [0, 1, 1],
  [1, 0, 0],
  [1, 0, 1],
  [1, 1, 0],
  [1, 1, 1] ]

As a generator function with yield:

def truthtable (n): 
  if n < 1:
    yield []
    return
  subtable = truthtable(n-1)
  for row in subtable:
    for v in [0,1]:
      yield row + [v]

Also simply changing the return from an array comprehension to a generator expression makes the return type equivalent to the yield version's generator function:

def truthtable (n):
  if n < 1:
    return [[]]
  subtable = truthtable(n-1)
  return ( row + [v] for row in subtable for v in [0,1] )
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how would it look like using yield? I'm kinda new in python. –  evildead Jun 13 '11 at 22:37

Have a look at the itertools module

In [7]: [i for i in itertools.product([0,1], repeat=3)]
Out[7]: 
[(0, 0, 0),
 (0, 0, 1),
 (0, 1, 0),
 (0, 1, 1),
 (1, 0, 0),
 (1, 0, 1),
 (1, 1, 0),
 (1, 1, 1)]
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itertools really is the way to go as has been pointed out by everyone. But if you really want to see the nuts and bolts of the algorithm required for this, you should look up recursive descent. Here's how it would work in your case:

def tablize(n, truths=[]):
    if not n:
        print truths
    else:
        for i in [True, False]:
            tablize(n-1, truths+[i])

Tested, working

Hope this helps

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beautiful, thank you! –  evildead Jun 13 '11 at 22:35
    
can you give me a version which uses yield? Would be very helpful for further problems :) I like yield in scala so much ;) –  evildead Jun 13 '11 at 22:38
    
It should just work if you changed print to yield –  inspectorG4dget Jun 14 '11 at 13:31

returning a datastructure representing the table is fine

...in that case range(2 ** n) is all you need. Each number in the range represents a row in the truth table. The ith bit of the binary representation of the number k is 1 if and only if the ith variable is true in the kth row of the table.

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