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int LetterCount = 0;
string strText = "Debugging";
string letter;

for (int i = 0; i <strText.Length; i++)
{
  letter = strText.Substring(0, 9);
  if(letter == "g")
  {    
    LetterCount++;
    textBox1.Text = "g appears " + LetterCount + " times";
  }
}

So, I'm doing this tutorial thing, and I've been stuck on this exercise for like 4 hours. And I can't figure out what's wrong with my For Loop.

The point of the exercise is to make my program thing tell me how many g's are in the word debugging. But you probably figured that out. Anyway, I'm not even sure that I have the right code for telling me that, because I think that I need to change the second part of the For Loop (the i < ) part.

But my problem is that it isn't registering the "if letter == "g" " at all. Because according to my locals window it says that letter=Debugging, which would make me think that g should be registering on my program 24 times, I think (because str.length is 9 letters long?) But it's registering as 0 no matter what I do.

share|improve this question
    
BTW, you should also consider using string.Equals when comparing two strings, because you can set whether comparison should be case and linguistically sensitive. –  Ivan Ičin Jun 13 '11 at 22:01
    
You don't need to update that text box every time you run through the loop. Move this line after your for loop. textBox1.Text = "g appears " + LetterCount + " times"; –  Craig M Jun 13 '11 at 22:02
    
Omg. So, the tutorial was stupid. It told me to put 0, 1. –  Cole Jun 13 '11 at 22:05

10 Answers 10

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You are extracting a string of 9 characters. It will never be equal to "g" (which only has one). Here's how I'd do it.

int count = 0;
foreach (char c in strText)
{
    if (c == 'g')
       count++;
}

Using the for loop:

for (int i = 0; i < strText.Length; i++)
{
    if (strText[i] == 'g')
       count++;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Jonathan, the downside to this is it's a foreach not a for loop, so the OP won't gain an understanding of a "plain vanilla" for loop from it, which I'd guess is the main intent of the tutorial they're following; or at least the current section =) –  Rob Jun 13 '11 at 22:00
    
I would probably do the loop in just one line just to impress the teacher: foreach (char c in strText) if (c == 'g') count++; :o) –  balexandre Jun 13 '11 at 22:01
    
@Rob: Well, I did point out what seems to be the primary error in my mind. As indicated, that's just probably the approach I'd take. But, yes, if this is some sort of school assignment, hey may not yet be familiar with foreach. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 13 '11 at 22:02
    
@balexandre: Heh, well in that case, perhaps you'd like a compact LINQ statement. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 13 '11 at 22:04
    
added code if he needs to use the for loop instead the foreach –  balexandre Jun 13 '11 at 22:05

Take a look at the documentation for string.Substring(x, y).

Basically:

letter = strText.Substring(0, 9);

Isn't giving you a letter. Each time through it's giving you all 9 characters of the string strText. You might want to consider using the variable i for one of the values you pass to Substring.

(I've deliberately not given you the entire answer as you seem to want to understand, so, if the pointers I've given don't get you there, let me know and I'll expand my answer =)

share|improve this answer
    
Well I had 0,1, but that was just getting me stuck at D. I think the tutorial I was reading was wrong, because it told me to put 0, 1. But putting i, 1 fixed it. Thank you :D <3 –  Cole Jun 13 '11 at 22:03
1  
@Cole, glad I could help =) It sounds very much like the tutorial you're working through had a typo (or three)! Oh and welcome to stackoverflow =) –  Rob Jun 13 '11 at 22:04

Try this:

    for (int i = 0; i <strText.Length; i++)
    {

       if(strText[i] == 'g')
       {
         LetterCount++;
       }
    }
    textBox1.Text = "g appears " + LetterCount + " times";

The issue is that you are looking at the entire string when you compare to "g". By specifying an index you are telling it to look at a specific character in the string. Also, I removed your substring because it did not appear to be doing anything.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you meant letter[i] == 'g'. –  Jonathan Wood Jun 13 '11 at 22:00
    
Not sure that your first line is correct, more or less, you've just copied the value of strText. Did you mean to use .ToCharArray() instead? –  ben f. Jun 13 '11 at 22:01
    
Yes, thank you. –  Abe Miessler Jun 13 '11 at 22:01
    
@ben, no I didn't plan on using ToCharArray. Which part is it that you think is not correct? The for loop? –  Abe Miessler Jun 13 '11 at 22:04

You're not using i at all in your for loop.

Do you mean

letter = strText.Substring(i, 1);

?

share|improve this answer
    
Ohhhh, is that my problem? –  Cole Jun 13 '11 at 22:00
    
I'm fairly blind. I couldn't tell if it was an I or a 1 on the tutorial :[ –  Cole Jun 13 '11 at 22:01
    
Happens more and more as you get older. :) –  John Jun 13 '11 at 22:04

Well, you are taking substring that is long 9 charachters and comparing it to "g". It won't be equal.

You should try:

letter = strText.Substring(i,1);
share|improve this answer

Because String.Substring(int, int) takes two arguments: the offset and amount to take.

In your case, letter = strText.Substring(0, 9); will simply assign letter's value to "Debugging". If you want to check each letter individually, you need to write letter = strText.Substring(i, 1).

share|improve this answer

You're probably looking for something like this:

int LetterCount = 0;
string strText = "Debugging";
string letter;

for (int i = 0; i <strText.Length; i++)
{
  letter = strText.Substring(i, 1);
  if(letter == "g")
  {    
    LetterCount++;
    textBox1.Text = "g appears " + LetterCount + " times";

  }
}
share|improve this answer

letter = strText.Substring(0, 9);

at this point, 'letter' has the value "Debugging" since you're taking the entire string.

Try letter = strText[i] so you isolate the single letter.

share|improve this answer

What @Rob said.

Try something like this:

int    gCount = 0;
string s      = "Debugging";

for ( int i = 0; i <strText.Length; i++)
{
  if ( s[i] == 'g' ) ++gCount ;
}
textBox1.Text = "g appears " + gCount+ " times";
share|improve this answer
namespace runtime
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

            int lettercount = 0;
            string strText = "Debugging";
            string letter;


            for (int i = 0; i < strText.Length; i++)
            {
                letter = strText.Substring(i,1);

                if (letter == "g")
                {
                    lettercount++;
                }

            }
            textBox1.Text = "g appear " + lettercount + " times";
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please add more details with code –  Sachin Chavan Oct 26 '12 at 8:07

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