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I’m not sure what this is called, or where I did see this, so I don’t really know what to search for. Therefore I’m trying to explain what I mean.

Suppose I have the following class structure, where TypeB is used within TypeA:

class TypeA
{
    public TypeB B
    { get; set }
}

class TypeB
{
    public int X
    { get; set }
}

Now when I have an instance of TypeA, I want to disallow, that I can directly modify the values of TypeB without reassigning. So basically I want to prevent this:

TypeA a = new TypeA();

// this should not be possible:
a.B.X = 1234;

// but this should work:
TypeB b = a.B;
b.X = 1234;
a.B = b;

The reason is that I am persisting the object in a special way, so to keep track of changes in TypeB correctly, I want to require that the value of B within TypeA is reassigned.

I think that I have seen a similar thing before with some built-in object, where this threw an error and compile time. What is this called, and how can I achieve it in my custom types?

share|improve this question
    
You could use something like popsicle immutability which is described on Eric Lippert's blog here: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2007/11/13/… –  John Rasch Jun 13 '11 at 22:43
4  
It's a long shot, but if you can make TypeB a struct, then the compiler will complain the way you want it to... –  agent-j Jun 13 '11 at 22:45
    
A mutable struct, regardless of what some people say about them, offers precisely the sort of semantics you seek. In fact, I'm not quite sure of the benefit of disallowing the first statement, but the big benefit of using structs is that "a=b; a.X=4;" will not alter b.x. –  supercat Oct 27 '11 at 19:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can return a copy of the TypeB object from the property getter in TypeA:

class TypeA
{
    private TypeB _b;
    public TypeB B
    {
        get { return (TypeB)_b.Clone(); }
        set { _b = value; }
    }
}

This will prevent modifying the properties of _b directly. However, it won't actually disallow to do a.B.X = 1234;, but the instruction will have no effect (it will only modify a copy that will immediately be discarded).

Unless TypeB is a struct, there is no way to prevent such an instruction:

  • it can't be detected at compile time, because the compiler doesn't know that it would modify a copy (again, unless it's a struct)
  • it can't be detected at runtime either, because you can't tell the difference between:

    TypeB b = a.B;
    b.X = 1234;
    

    and

    a.B.X = 1234;
    

    In both cases the property is called the same way, and there is no way to know what the calling code is doing with the result...

share|improve this answer
    
Well, something similar to this already happens automatically from my persistence logic. So I don’t really care if someone manages to set the value, as it won’t have an effect anyway. I just want to make sure that people using it, know this, hence I want to disallow it. –  poke Jun 13 '11 at 23:02
    
I am sure this violates many coding guidelines, but it will silently but effectivly prevent modification of _b :-) –  TheFogger Jun 13 '11 at 23:05
    
@poke, the only way to do that would be to make TypeB a struct... then the compiler would complain. –  Thomas Levesque Jun 13 '11 at 23:17
    
See my updated answer –  Thomas Levesque Jun 13 '11 at 23:26
    
Thanks for your answer, it cleared up what I was already suspecting. Given that I already have an implicit cloning, I'll consider using a struct instead. –  poke Jun 16 '11 at 9:28

In WPF/Silverlight there are two concepts of having "sealed" and "frozen" objects. Basically, once sealed/frozen, the object cannot be changed. You may be able to apply the same logic here:

public class SealableObject {

    public bool IsSealed { get; private set; }

    public void Seal() {
        if (this.IsSealed)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("The object is already sealed");
        this.IsSealed = true;
    }

    protected void VerifyNotSealed() {
        if (this.IsSealed)
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Object is sealed");
    }
}

Then you would need to check IsSealed in your derived class TypeB, like so:

class TypeB : SealableObject
{
    private int x;
    public int X
    {
        get { return this.x; }
        set {
            this.VerifyNotSealed();
            this.x = value;
        }
}

And then you'd need to seal TypeB when it is assigned to your TypeA property.

share|improve this answer
2  
AOP would be a nice fit for this idea. That way you'd just decorate the properties you want Sealable instead of having to write the "extra" check for every property. –  Esteban Araya Jun 13 '11 at 22:56
    
Your code prevents modifying X when the TypeB object is sealed, but that's not really what the OP is asking... –  Thomas Levesque Jun 13 '11 at 23:28
    
@Thomas - If TypeA seals the TypeB it receives, then it ensures that it's not modified via a.B.X. Additionally, if some additional class holds a separate reference to the same instance of TypeB, then that class won't be allowed to modify the value either. Not sure how that doesn't apply to what the OP is asking, care to clarify? –  CodeNaked Jun 13 '11 at 23:42
    
The OP wants to be able to modify the properties of TypeB through a variable, but not directly through the property. With your solution you can never assign the properties of the TypeB object returned by the property, so the second case in the OP's example won't work. –  Thomas Levesque Jun 14 '11 at 0:26
    
@Thomas - Ah, I see. –  CodeNaked Jun 14 '11 at 0:28

Have TypeB implement an interface that defines X with only a getter. Expose a property with this interface type on TypeA. Now you can only modify the property's properties when you do a downcast, which is the most you can aim for.

This method will give you compile time safety. If you only need runtime safety, look at CodeNaked's answer.

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Your current code will not allow what you want. You cannot make int X read / write and only make it read only when B is stored in A. If you really want to keep the int X immutable, than don't keep it in type B. Instead keep the int value in A instead, and make it a read only value there.

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What if you made the property B in class A a readonly field? That way it could only set a construction and not changed afterwards.

Also, what about an internal/private setter? Does that fill the needs?

share|improve this answer
    
-1 It's TypeB that @poke wants to lock down, not typeA. –  agent-j Jun 13 '11 at 22:48
    
@agent-j: That's why it's the property that's set to readonly. –  Esteban Araya Jun 13 '11 at 22:51
    
-1 readonly TypeB B in class TypeA will not prevent a.B.X = 3, which is what the OP wants to prevent. –  TheFogger Jun 13 '11 at 23:00

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