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I need to convert a large decimal to binary how would I go about doing this? Decimal in question is this 3324679375210329505

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what have you tried?. a tag of 'binary' isn't very helpful. –  Mitch Wheat Jun 14 '11 at 0:18
    
are you writing in assembly? –  TomHarrigan Jun 14 '11 at 0:21
3  
That doesn't look like 2^63. –  alternative Jun 14 '11 at 0:25
1  
If you have to do this yourself instead of using library functions, I recently reworked my stackoverflow answer on a similar question into a blog entry. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 14 '11 at 0:26
1  
The number ends with 5, it will not be 2^anything. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 14 '11 at 0:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

http://www.wikihow.com/Convert-from-Decimal-to-Binary

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-1 : Always use the built-in API's before reinventing the wheel and writing your own code. See @roadrunner's (correct) answer. –  Bohemian Jun 14 '11 at 1:36
1  
@Bohemian: "Always" even if it's a trivial two-liner and the in-built solution is quite inefficient? I'm sure you agree that that's a bit of a generalization (not that I don't agree generally) :) –  Voo Jun 14 '11 at 1:45
    
At the time I wrote this, the question has one tag only: "Binary". Given the lack of context, I went for the general "how to understand the algorithm" answer. –  The Evil Greebo Jun 14 '11 at 2:20

A bit pointless, but here is a solution in C:

void to_binary(unsigned long long n)
{
    char str[65], *ptr = str + 1;
    str[0] = '\n';
    do{
        *ptr++ = '0' + (n&1);
    } while(n >>= 1);
    while(ptr > str)
        putc(*--ptr, stdout);
}

For the example, it prints out:

    10111000100011101000100100011011011111011110101011010110100001

EDIT: And if you don't mind leading zeros....

void to_binary(unsigned long long n)
{
    do{ putc('0' + (n>>63), stdout); } while(n <<= 1);
}
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And now add the conversion from decimal :-) –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 14 '11 at 1:21

If you want something fast (over 50% faster than Long.toString(n, 2) and 150-400% faster than BigInteger.toString(2)) that handles negative numbers the same as the built-ins, try the following:

static String toBinary (long n) {
    int neg = n < 0 ? 1 : 0;
    if(n < 0) n = -n;
    int pos = 0;
    boolean[] a = new boolean[64];
    do {
        a[pos++] = n % 2 == 1;
    } while ((n >>>= 1) != 0);
    char[] c = new char[pos + neg];
    if(neg > 0) c[0] = '-';
    for (int i = 0; i < pos; i++) {
        c[pos - i - 1 + neg] = a[i] ? '1' : '0';
    }
    return new String(c);
}

If you want the actual Two's Compliment binary representation of the long (with leading 1s or 0s):

static String toBinaryTC (long n) {
    char[] c = new char[64];
    for(int i = 63; i >= 0; i--, n >>>= 1) {
        c[i] = n % 2 != 0 ? '1' : '0';          
    }
    return new String(c);        
}
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I would use a Stack! Check if your decimal number is even or odd, if even push a 0 to the stack and if its odd push a 1 to the stack. Then once your decimal number hits 1, you can pop each value from the stack and print each one.

Here is a very inefficient block of code for reference. You will probably have to use long instead of integer.

import java.util.Stack;

public class DecBinConverter {

Stack<Integer> binary;

public DecBinConverter()
{
    binary = new Stack<Integer>();
}

public int dec_Bin(int dec)
{
    if(dec == 1)
    {
        System.out.print(1);
        return 0;
    }
    if(dec == 0)
    {
        System.out.print(0);
        return 0;
    }
        if((dec%2) == 0)
        {
            binary.push(0);
            dec = dec/2;
        }
        else
        {
            binary.push(1);
            dec = dec/2;
        }   
        while(dec != 1)
        {

            if((dec%2) == 0)
            {
                binary.push(0);
                dec = dec/2;

            }
            else
            {
                binary.push(1);
                dec = dec/2;
            }   
        }
        if((dec%2) == 0)
        {
            binary.push(0);
            dec = dec/2;
        }
        else
        {
            binary.push(1);
            dec = dec/2;

        }
        int x = binary.size();
        for(int i = 0; i < x; i++)
        {
            System.out.print(binary.pop());
        }
        return 0;

}

}
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You may want to go for BigDecimal.

A BigDecimal consists of an arbitrary precision integer unscaled value and a 32-bit integer scale.The BigDecimal class provides operations for arithmetic, scale manipulation, rounding, comparison, hashing, and format conversion. The toString() method provides a canonical representation of a BigDecimal.

new BigDecimal("3324679375210329505").toString(2);
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Why -1 ? Please care to explain .. –  99tm Jun 14 '11 at 0:27
    
@roadrunner: Your name is awesome. :D +1 –  Mehrdad Jun 14 '11 at 0:46
2  
Maybe for the you must? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 14 '11 at 0:48
1  
This doesn't even work! BigDecimal's toString takes no parameters. –  Luigi Plinge Jun 14 '11 at 3:01
1  
@roadrunner: BigDecimal has not toString method that takes radix, BigInteger does. Which is kinda logical. –  Denis Tulskiy Jun 14 '11 at 3:54

How about:

String binary = Long.toString(3324679375210329505L, 2);
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OK, but limited to size of number to 9223372036854775807 –  Bohemian Jun 14 '11 at 1:37
1  
@Bohemian - true, but the title suggested that it would fit in 63 bits (so don't even need to worry about the sign). –  Ted Hopp Jun 14 '11 at 1:56

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