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The last statement does not compile. please refer to the comments along with the code for the detail of my question.

class Test
{
    private static void Foo(Delegate d){}

    private static void Bar(Action a){}

    static void Main()
    {
        Foo(new Action(() => { Console.WriteLine("a"); })); // Action converts to Delegate implicitly

        Bar(() => { Console.WriteLine("b"); }); // lambda converts to Action implicitly

        Foo(() => { Console.WriteLine("c"); }); // Why doesn't this compile ? (lambda converts to Action implicitly, and then Action converts to Delegate implicitly)
    }
}
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1  
Consider including the compiler error messages in the post. It will aid in search-ability as well as context (for people who have not run into this situation before) -- and consider making the title relevant to the question :) [A humanized form of the error message should be a good starting point for the title] –  user166390 Jun 14 '11 at 2:36
    
still have another question: we already have lambda and Action, Func<T>, why do we still need delegate? If there is NO such thing called delegate, there will be NO such annoying problem. –  Peter Long Jun 14 '11 at 5:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because the .net compiler doesn't know what type of delegate to turn the lambda into. It could be an Action, or it could be a void MyDelegate().

If you change it as follows, it should work:

Foo(new Action(() => { Console.WriteLine("c"); }));
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or create private delegate void FooDelegate(); and use it. –  Bala R Jun 14 '11 at 2:31

Why should the compiler know how to two-step: from lambda -> Action -> Delegate?

This compiles:

class Test
{
    private static void Foo(Delegate d) { }

    private static void Bar(Action a) { }

    static void Main()
    {
        Foo(new Action(() => { Console.WriteLine("world2"); })); // Action converts to Delegate implicitly

        Bar(() => { Console.WriteLine("world3"); }); // lambda converts to Action implicitly

        Foo((Action)(() => { Console.WriteLine("world3"); })); // This compiles
    }
}
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