Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm using Windows 7, and I've tried this under Python 2.6.6 and Python 3.2.

So I'm trying to call this command line from Python:

netstat -ano | find ":80"

under Windows cmd, this line works perfectly fine.

So,

  • 1st attempt:

    output = subprocess.Popen(
               [r'netstat -ano | find ":80"'],
               stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
               shell=True
    ).communicate()
    

    An error is raised that 'find' actually didn't receive correct parameter (e.g. 'find ":80" \'):

    Access denied - \
    
  • 2nd attempt:

    #calling netstat
    cmd_netstat = subprocess.Popen(
                    ['netstat','-ano'],
                    stdout = subprocess.PIPE
    )
    
    #pipelining netstat result into find
    cmd_find = subprocess.Popen(
                 ['find','":80"'],
                 stdin = cmd_netstat.stdout,
                 stdout = subprocess.PIPE
    )
    

    Again, the same error is raised.

    Access denied - \
    

What did I do wrong? :(

EDIT:

  • 3rd attempt (As @Pavel Repin suggested):

    cmd_netstat = subprocess.Popen(
                    ['cmd.exe', '-c', 'netstat -ano | find ":80"'],
                    stdout=subprocess.PIPE
    ).communicate()
    

    Unfortunately, subprocess with ['cmd.exe','-c'] results in something resembling deadlock or a blank cmd window. I assume '-c' is ignored by cmd, resulting in communicate() waiting indefinitely for cmd termination. Since this is Windows, my bet bet is cmd only accepts parameter starting with slash (/). So I substituted '-c' with '/c':

    cmd_netstat = subprocess.Popen(
                    ['cmd.exe', '/c', 'netstat -ano | find ":80"'],
                    stdout=subprocess.PIPE
    ).communicate()
    

    And...back to the same error:

    Access denied - \
    

EDIT: I gave up, I'll just process the string returned by 'netstat -ano' in Python. Might this be a bug?

share|improve this question
    
In attempt N1, maybe this may work: ['cmd.exe', '-c', 'netstat -ano | find ":80"'] as the args array. In that case, also remove shell=True. –  Pavel Repin Jun 14 '11 at 7:57
    
@PavelRepin Just tried this in both Python 2.6.6 and Python 3.2. Unfortunately, subprocess with ['cmd.exe','-c'] results in something resembling deadlock or a blank cmd window... –  EwyynTomato Jun 14 '11 at 9:23
    
(deleted, moved to attempt 3) –  EwyynTomato Jun 14 '11 at 10:36
    
Sorry @madeOfMeat, -c was a braino on my part. You did right by trying /c, although it's sad that it still didn't help. –  Pavel Repin Jun 15 '11 at 0:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

So I revisited this question, and found two solutions (I switched to Python 2.7 sometime ago, so I'm not sure about Python 2.6, but it should be the same.):

  1. Replace find with findstr, and remove doublequotes

    output = subprocess.Popen(['netstat','-ano','|','findstr',':80'],
                              stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
                              shell=True)
                       .communicate()
    

    But this doesn't explain why "find" cannot be used, so:

  2. Use string parameter instead of list

    output = subprocess.Popen('netstat -ano | find ":80"',
                              stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
                              shell=True)
                       .communicate()
    

    or

    pipeout = subprocess.Popen(['netstat', '-ano'], 
                               stdout = subprocess.PIPE)
    output = subprocess.Popen('find ":80"', 
                              stdin = pipeout.stdout, 
                              stdout = subprocess.PIPE)
                       .communicate()
    

The problem arise from the fact that: ['find','":80"'] is actually translated into ['find,'\":80\"']. Thus the following command is executed in Windows command shell:

>find \":80\"
Access denied - \

Proof:

  • Running:

    output = subprocess.Popen(['echo','find','":80"'],
                              stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
                              shell=True)
                       .communicate()
    print output[0]
    

    returns:

    find \":80\"
    
  • Running:

    output = subprocess.Popen('echo find ":80"',
                              stdout=subprocess.PIPE,
                              shell=True)
                       .communicate()
    print output[0]
    

    returns:

    find ":80"
    
share|improve this answer
    
Why not .Popen(['find', ':80'], ...)? –  Eric Jul 31 '14 at 12:40

What I suggest is that you do the maximum inside Python code. So, you can execute the following command:

# executing the command
import subprocess
output = subprocess.Popen(['netstat', '-ano'], stdout=subprocess.PIPE).communicate()

and then by parsing the output:

# filtering the output
valid_lines = [ line for line in output[0].split('\r\n') if ':80' in line ]

You will get a list of lines. On my computer, the output looks like this for port number 1900 (no html connexion active):

['  UDP    127.0.0.1:1900         *:*                                    1388', '  UDP    192.xxx.xxx.233:1900    *:*                                    1388']

In my opinion, this is easier to work with.

Note that :

  • option shell=True is not mandatory, but a command-line window is opened-closed quickly. See what suits you the most, but take care of command injection;
  • list of Popen arguments shall be a list of string. Quoting of the list parts is not necessary, subprocess will take care of it for you.

Hope this helps.

EDIT: oops, I missed the last line of the edit. Seems you've already got the idea on your own.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.