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INFORMIX-SQL 4.10.DC1 (SE Engine), on DOS 6.22, under Microsoft Virtual PC 2007, in Windows 7!

EDIT: Looking for Jonathan Leffler's wisdom on this one!

I have a child table called transaction and a parent table called customer.

These tables are joined by customer.pk_id SERIAL = transaction.fk_id INTEGER.

The transaction table has a clustered index on fk_id so that each customers transactions are physically grouped together with the data matching the index. The reason I chose the cluster index on fk_id is because most queries are done on customer name and this quickly returns all of the transactions belonging to the queried customer.

The transaction table also has a column called transaction_number SERIAL with a unique index.

When a new transaction is added for any customer, a new row is added at EOF with the highest transaction_number.. Note: Informix does not maintain the physical clustering in the datafile after the index is created.

So when I want to print a customer receipt of the last transaction entered I do the following query:

SELECT * 
  FROM customer c, 
       transaction t
 WHERE c.pk_id = t.fk_id
   AND t.trx_num = (SELECT MAX(trx_num)
                      FROM transaction)

EDIT: The following INDEXES exist:

UNIQUE INDEX ON customer(pk_id) {SERIAL}
UNIQUE CLUSTER INDEX ON customer(last_name,sur_name,first_name,middle_name) {CHAR(30's)}
UNIQUE INDEX ON customer(ident_type,ident_num,ident_state,ident_country) {CHARS(n)}

UNIQUE CLUSTER INDEX ON transaction(fk_id) {INT}
UNIQUE INDEX ON transaction(trx_num) {SERIAL}

EDIT: EXPLAIN results for the above query:

QUERY:
------
SELECT *
  FROM customer c,
       transaction t,
 WHERE c.pk_id   = t.fk_id           
   AND t.trx_num = (SELECT MAX(trx_num) 
                      FROM transaction)

Estimated Cost: 14
Estimated # of Rows Returned: 2

1) f.transaction: INDEX PATH

    (1) Index Keys: trx_num 
        Lower Index Filter: f.transaction.trx_num = <subquery> 

2) f.customer: INDEX PATH

    (1) Index Keys: pk_id 
        Lower Index Filter: f.customer.pk_id = f.transaction.fk_id 

    Subquery:
    ---------
    Estimated Cost: 3
    Estimated # of Rows Returned: 1

    1) f.trx_num: INDEX PATH

        (1) Index Keys: trx_num 

It seems like the query optimizer is doing a full table scan on transaction in order to locate the highest transaction number, whose new row is always placed at EOF , but since transactions are grouped by fk_id, the rest of the transaction numbers are scattered throughout the table.

Is there a better way for obtaining a quicker response time on the query?

Would CREATE UNIQUE INDEX trxnumidx ON transaction(transaction_number) DESCENDING help in quickly locating the MAX transaction_number?

EDIT: I do have a similar query which quickly retrieves the desired transaction and customer information so that the user can print the last entered transaction, or any previously entered transaction, but it requires the user to input the transaction number:

SELECT * 
      FROM customer c, 
           transaction t
     WHERE c.pk_id = t.fk_id
       AND t.trx_num = $trxnum  {ace input variable, type INT}

What baffles me about this query, where the user manually inputs the transaction number, is that retrieval is instantaneous (total cost = 2), where as when automatic with MAX (total cost = 14).. The reason why I chose to make this query automatic is that in the past, when users manually input the transaction number, sometimes they inadvertently entered the wrong transaction number which happened to be a valid number and without realizing it, they signed and gave the customer a receipt with the wrong information on it!

EDIT: Would DBINFO('sqlca.sqlerrd1') be a more efficient way of locating the most recently inserted row?

share|improve this question
    
The query plan says that it is using the index on the transaction table to find the maximum value, and it should be able to get to that value very quickly - as reflected in the cost. With that, it then reads the transaction table a second time to find the row with that maximum transaction number, using the index again. It then looks up the corresponding row in customer, again using an indexed lookup. It is surprising that this is taking a long time; it should be efficient. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 16 '11 at 2:24
    
@Jonathan: Yes, surprising it takes 4 secs. with: 9100 transaction rows, 2500 customer rows, updated statistics, defragmented/cached disk and any other tweak I could think of!.. I thought my query was designed to be as efficient as possible!..would putting DESCENDING on the trx_num index help?.. maybe best solution is like you said "capture trx_num into a control_table immediately after an insert" and have ace report query that? –  FrankComputerAtYmailDotCom Jun 16 '11 at 14:38
    
I doubt if a descending index would help - as usual, you can try it and see if it makes a difference, but I would not expect it to. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 16 '11 at 15:19
    
I would've expected the index on trx_num to quickly provide the query optimizer with the MIN and MAX trx_num. However, explain says the cost on the max subquery is only 3, whereas the cost on locating the joined customer and transaction rows is 14-3=7. Too bad SE 4.1 does not support SELECT TOP or BOTTOM so I can just go directly to the last row which is the newly added trx_num. –  FrankComputerAtYmailDotCom Jun 17 '11 at 1:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you are wanting the maximum transaction number for a fk_id, I think I would expect to create an (optionally UNIQUE) index:

CREATE {UNIQUE} INDEX ix_lookup1 ON Transaction(FK_ID, Transaction_Number);

The index can be unique since transaction number alone is unique, but the point of this index is to speed up lookups for a given fk_id value.

I would then expect to use a query like the one that oers suggested:

SELECT * 
  FROM customer AS c, transaction AS t
 WHERE c.pk_id = t.fk_id
   AND c.pk_id = 12345678         -- crucial to limit the data to one return row
   AND t.transaction_number =
          (SELECT MAX(transaction_number)
             FROM transaction AS t2
            WHERE t2.fk_id = c.pk_id)

This is still a correlated sub-query, but given that the customer number is used, there will only be one row of data to return and it is blatant to the optimizer that this is the case. Depending on the programming language I was using, I might well arrange for the sub-query to use:

SELECT * 
  FROM customer AS c, transaction AS t
 WHERE c.pk_id = t.fk_id
   AND c.pk_id = 1234567
   AND t.transaction_number =
          (SELECT MAX(transaction_number)
             FROM transaction AS t2
            WHERE t2.fk_id = 1234567)

Or even:

SELECT * 
  FROM customer AS c, transaction AS t
 WHERE c.pk_id = t.fk_id
   AND c.pk_id = 1234567
   AND t.transaction_number =
          (SELECT MAX(transaction_number)
             FROM transaction AS t2
            WHERE t2.fk_id = 1234567)

You could use placeholders or create the SQL from a string as suits.

Even better, I'd avoid the problem by capturing the inserted serial value immediately after the insert so that (a) if the program ever went multi-user, it would still work and (b) the whole MAX issue would be avoided, and the query could become:

SELECT * 
  FROM customer AS c, transaction AS t
 WHERE c.pk_id = t.fk_id
   AND c.pk_id = 1234567
   AND t.transaction_number = 23456789;

Note that with the c.pk_id = 1234567 for the customer specified as a parameter to the query, you might not even need the index I suggested. And wherever I used a number, it would be fine with me to use a placeholder for the value to be supplied when the query is executed.

Remember, you are using software that is old enough to drink, let alone vote; the optimizer is not as good as the one you'd find in a more modern DBMS.

share|improve this answer
    
@Jonathan: OK, to give you a clearer picture: once the new transaction is added with the perform screen, the user exits the screen and immediately executes an ace report which prints the receipt of the most recently added transaction {MAX(tran_num)} without having to supply any input such as pk_id, fk_id, tran_num.. furthermore, each one of the abovementioned columns has their own index, so I cant see how a composite index on (fk_id,tran_num) would help speed things up!..I'm relying on tran_num = (SELECT MAX(tran_num) FROM transaction to obtain all necessary info needed for printing receipt. –  FrankComputerAtYmailDotCom Jun 15 '11 at 1:04
    
@Jonathan: What I'm seeking is if there's a way for optimizing the query, based on the way the rows are physically stored, either with a better SELECT statement, different INDEXING or another method for quickly capturing the MAX(tran_num).. maybe by adding an ESQL/C to the perform screen 'ON ENDING pf_putval($UPDATE control_table SET max_tran_num = :label_tran)?? or some other method? –  FrankComputerAtYmailDotCom Jun 15 '11 at 1:14
1  
@Frank: I want to say "time to upgrade to a more powerful tool than ISQL". I inherently deeply distrust single-user assumptions; too many years working with multi-user systems to be comfortable with it. With the caveats out of the way, we get on with the "customer's always right" bit. I would probably want to tie the action in the Perform screen to the ACE report more closely. I'd think in terms of having the Perform screen enter the transaction number into an auxilliary table that is cleaned out daily or more frequently. Then the report can select the maximum value from that table. (Cont'd) –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 15 '11 at 6:23
    
@Frank: I suspect that involves a little ESQL/C glue and a function in the form. If you really can't do it with the exact ID numbers, do it as you do without - and please don't complain about the performance, or the fact that it breaks when you go multi-user. What does the SET EXPLAIN query plan tell you about the query? There may be something you can do to speed things up. But there are so many variables to deal with it is hard to do it in 600 characters per comment. It always takes a long time to get you enough of an answer. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 15 '11 at 6:28
1  
@Frank: I suggest posting the SET EXPLAIN output - add it as extra information to your question. Also add the list of indexes available on the the two tables. My suspicion is that it is not the MAX that does the sequential scan but the main join. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 15 '11 at 13:53

Can you try using JOIN instead of the (implicit JOIN with) WHERE:

SELECT * 
FROM customer
  JOIN transaction
    ON customer.pk_id = transaction.fk_id
WHERE transaction.transaction_number = ( SELECT MAX(transaction_number)
                                         FROM transaction)

or this:

SELECT * 
FROM customer
  JOIN transaction
    ON customer.pk_id = transaction.fk_id
  JOIN ( SELECT MAX(transaction_number) AS max_tn
         FROM transaction
       ) AS tr
    ON transaction.transaction_number = tr.max_tn

Without using JOINs, I can think of this:

SELECT * 
  FROM customer
     , transaction
 WHERE customer.pk_id = transaction.fk_id
   AND transaction.transaction_number IN 
       ( SELECT MAX(transaction_number)
         FROM transaction
       )

Perhaps the IN (SELECT ...) is better optimized than = (SELECT ...)


You can also try putting the tables (and conditions) in reverse order:

SELECT * 
  FROM transaction, customer 
 WHERE transaction.transaction_number
       = ( SELECT MAX(transaction_number)
           FROM transaction )
  AND customer.pk_id = transaction.fk_id

No idea if the following will work or if it will raise error but it's worth trying:

SELECT * 
FROM 
      ( SELECT MAX(transaction_number) AS max_tn
        FROM transaction
      )
  AS tr
   , transaction
   , customer
WHERE transaction.transaction_number = tr.max_tn
  AND customer.pk_id = transaction.fk_id
share|improve this answer
    
This version of Informix does not support the JOIN keyword. Joins are done with the '=' relop, as illustrated in the query. If JOIN keyword were to be supported, what would be gained by using JOIN vs. '='? –  FrankComputerAtYmailDotCom Jun 14 '11 at 11:33
    
@Frank: I think that many optimizers would come up with same plan nowadays. But it helps visual reading the "query" and also writing more coplex queries in case where OUTER JOINs are needed instead of the INNER JOINs that = can achieve. Do you have any link to documentation for this release? –  ypercube Jun 14 '11 at 12:57
    
I would assume that using 'IN' vs. '=' would cost more!.. I only use 'IN' when I know more than one value will be evaluated. I consider 'IN' to be synonymous with 'OR', which is costly!.. As for reversing the table order, I don't think it makes a difference, and as for your last example using an alias for the aggregate query, it would definitely raise a syntax error, but I will nevertheless try your examples and see what EXPLAIN tells me. I think the whole key to achieving faster retrieval is to find a way to avoid a full table scan.. I do have full documentation for this release. –  FrankComputerAtYmailDotCom Jun 14 '11 at 15:44
    
@Frank: I asked about documentation because the probelm might be easier to solve using a transaction or a stored procedure (and I have no idea if that is possible in that version). Saving the result of (SELECT MAX ...) into a temp variable and then running the query. –  ypercube Jun 15 '11 at 11:44
    
@ypercude: transactions are supported in this version, but I dont use it. that would add overhead!.. however, stored procedures are not supported until ISQL 5.0 .. saving result into a temp would also add more overhead, the example query is about as direct I can think of, except for doing trx_num = 123456, but that would require user to input the trx_num. the purpose of the ticket printing ace report is so that the most recently entered transaction is automatically printed. –  FrankComputerAtYmailDotCom Jun 16 '11 at 1:04

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