Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C++, I'm trying to create a specialized point class as a union, like so:

union point
{
  struct { float x, y, z; };
  float val[3];
  float operator[](unsigned i) { return val[i]; }
};

So that I can access the point as an array or as multiple points, for readability.

However, let's say that I want to generalise this a bit:

template<unsigned n>
  union point
  {
    struct { float ???; };
    float val[n];
    float operator[](unsigned i) { return val[i]; }
  };

What can I put for ???? I could have x, x, y, x, y, z, or x, y, z, w depending on what n is. Solution? Forward declarations!

template<unsigned n>
  union point
  {
    struct coords;
    float val[n];
    float operator[](unsigned i) { return val[i]; }
  };

template<>
  struct point::coords<3>
  {
    float x, y, z;
  };

// ...

But this doesn't appear to work. Under the GCC 4.6, it compiles, however, whenever that I try to use the members, like so:

point<3> val;
val.x;

I get the error:

error: ‘union point<3>’ has no member named ‘x’

Even if I change val.x to val.coords::x, I still get the error:

error: ‘union point<3>::coords’ is not a base of ‘union point<3>’

Adding using coords; in the union definition didn't help, either.

Is there any way to accomplish this under the GCC 4.6? Is there a different method of doing this? Is it even possible?

share|improve this question
    
If you have to specialize each template instance, why not just declare 4 different unions (sans templates) and be done with it? –  Adam Rosenfield Jun 14 '11 at 3:13
    
Are you interested in solutions to "[accessing] the point as an array or as multiple points, for readability" in a more general sense too, or is the union stuff necessary? –  Luc Danton Jun 14 '11 at 4:29
    
Luc - The main reason is that 99% of the time, x, y, z, and w will be used as member accessors, but I still want to allow the ability to easily iterate through the points' values without having to do a hackish pointer typecast. –  RétroX Jul 10 '11 at 14:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would suggest using variadic macro to define your union<N> templates.

template<unsigned int N>
union point; // declared and undefined

#define DECLARE_POINT(NUM, ...) \
template<> \
union point<NUM> \
{ \
  struct { float __VA_ARGS__; }; \
  float val[NUM]; \
}

#undef DECLARE_POINT

Having done this, you can simply declare/define your various combinations for coordinates (before #undef in this case):

DECLARE_POINT(1, x);
DECLARE_POINT(2, x, y);
DECLARE_POINT(3, x, y, z);

that is equivalent to,

template<> union point<1> { struct { float x; }; float val[1]; };
template<> union point<2> { struct { float x, y; }; float val[2]; };
template<> union point<3> { struct { float x, y, z; }; float val[3]; };

It can be used in the same way you asked:

point<3> p;
p.z = 0;

Also, you can put a cross check using some template trickery (static_assert) to check the number arguments(e.g. 1,2,3,...) match the total argument passed (e.g. x,y,z,...).

share|improve this answer

This line inside your union:

struct coords;

forward-declares the type coords, but there's no struct coords field in your templated union.

Besides, only members of anonymous structures can be accessed as top-level fields of an union. For instance:

union foo {
    struct { // anonymous struct
        short i;
        short j;
    };
    int k;
};

foo f;
// it's possible to access the fields of the anonymous struct as if they were
// direct members of the union
f.i = 4;
f.j = 8;
std::cout << f.k;

I'm not sure you'll be able to do that if you only specialize the inner struct type.

However, this works:

template<unsigned n>
union point;

template<>
union point<2> {
    struct { float x, y; };
    float val[2];
};

template<>
union point<3> {
    struct { float x, y, z; };
    float val[3];
};

There is a number of downsides though; the main one being that you'll have to redefine operator[] for each version of point.

I know how to use templates but I'm no template god, so it's not out of question that a clever trick exists.

share|improve this answer
3  
It should be mentioned that anonymous structs are not part of C++, but only a popular extension (and will become part of C1x, next C version; however, not of C++0x). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 14 '11 at 4:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.