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I need to use cross-appdomain calls in my app, and sometimes I have this RemotingException: Object '/2fa53226_da41_42ba_b185_ec7d9c454712/ygiw+xfegmkhdinj7g2kpkhc_7.rem' has been disconnected or does not exist at the server.
The target object is still alive, I have checked it.

UPD I've set breakpoint in the finalizer of the target object, and it never hits. Thus, this object is alive and wasn't GC'ed.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted

That is probably because the local garbage collector at the server side collects the object. You can prevent that by renewing the leasing. You can read more about that in these articles:

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It can't be GC'ed, because server-side keeps reference to this object. –  user626528 Jun 14 '11 at 7:16
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If you have disabled Lifetime management, the object remains exposed by remoting (so it can't be GC'ed) until you disconnect it on the server side. –  Guillaume Jun 14 '11 at 8:24
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On the Server side you can call RemotingServices.Disconnect(myObject); –  Guillaume Jun 14 '11 at 9:26
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Remoting keeps a reference on your object as long as it's exposed. If the lifetime is infinite, Remoting will keep a reference forever unless you explicity tell it to close the server and release the reference (that is done by calling Disconnect). –  Guillaume Jun 14 '11 at 10:26
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@user626528 The reference died ? When ? You mean without changing lifetime ? If so, that's because if no method is called by the client for a certain period, default Remoting automatically disconnect it and release its reference. –  Guillaume Jun 14 '11 at 11:55

This is because the Lifetime management on the server side disconnects the object when its lease expires, to allow GC to collect it. If you try to use it from the client side, you will get an Exception, even if it has not been GC'd on the server yet (e.g. because there still is another reference to it) but the lease has expired. This is to avoid unpredictable behaviour. The accepted answer provides a good reference on how to correctly manage the lifetime of Remote .NET Objects.

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Thanks for explanation, voted –  Shelest May 24 '13 at 14:06

in my case, the problem was that in the client computer, there was an virtual network adapter active, disabling the virtual network adapters, the problem was solved

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