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I have a class structure like this:

class A {
    public someFunction() {
        $objectB = new B();
        $result = $objectB->getResult();
        return $result;
    }
}

I am writing the unit test for someFunction() that belongs to class A. However, it depends on class B. I can mock someFunction() but how can I resolve the dependency on class B? I want to mock class B automatically.

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What is your understanding of mocking? If you're going to test someFunction, why would you mock it? You would normally mock the dependencies of your test subject -- not your test subject itself. –  Ates Goral Jun 14 '11 at 6:23
    
I made a mistake, i wanted to mock object class A and test someFunction.It depends class B –  Hüseyin BABAL Jun 14 '11 at 6:34
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use dependency injection: either provide a method to set the B object, or pass the b object optionally to someFunction().

Original code

class A {
    public function someFunction() {
        $objectB = new B();
        $result = $objectB->getResult();
        return $result;
    }
}

Optional parameter

class A {
    public function someFunction($objectB = null) {
        if ($objectB == null) { $objectB = new B(); }
        $result = $objectB->getResult();
        return $result;
    }
}

Setter method

class A {
    protected $b;


    public function __construct() {
        $this->b = new B();
    }

    public function setB($b) {
        $this->b = $b;
    }

    public function someFunction() {
        $result = $this->b->getResult();
        return $result;
    }
}
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2  
Just to add: The goal for new testable classes should usually be to get rid of the if $var == null $var new Object(); line all together and you pass it in from the outside. Just having that "optional just for testing" also can work but usually isn't the end goal or all that pretty. –  edorian Jun 14 '11 at 13:01
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Another possibility for dependency injection is to refactor to an "init" method, i.e.:

class A
{
    function setB ( B $b = null )
    {
        $this->b = ( !is_null($b) ? $b
            $this->initB()
        );
    }

    function initB ( )
    {
       return new B();
    }

    function someMethod ( )
    {
        return $this->b->getResult();
    }
}

With this implementation, subclasses of "A" can override "initB" to change the dependency and a mock of A generated with "PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase::getMock()" can define a canned return value for the method without relying on the functionality of the setter (or you can omit the setter).

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