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Can anyone please explain the major differences between a Soc and SBC?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

SBC is a PCB, SoC a chip.

SBC may contain a SoC (a chip) in addition to other components and connectors to build a stand-alone system. SoC in itself is rarely standalone but needs at least a few extra components and at least some connectors for power and interfacing.

A bit like car(SBC) and engine(SoC). A standalone engine is not functional but needs to be placed in a car.

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System on Chip (SoC) and Single Board Computer (SBC) are totally different to each other. Usually SOC is an important constituent of the SBC. System-on-a-chip (SoC) is an Integrated Circuit which houses all the critical elements of the electronic system on a single microchip. A SoC can usually have the on-chip memory, microprocessor, peripheral interfaces, , I/O logic control, etc. that are usually found inside a computer system. It is widely used across the embedded industry due to their small-form-factor, computational excellence and low power consumption. SBCs are off-the-shelf products that can be used to develop end-products or applications for a variety of industries. SBCs come along with integrated software and hardware, which includes System on Chips, memory, power requirements, real world multimedia and connectivity interfaces such as USB, UART, CAN, HDMI, Ethernet, SDIO, MMC, Analog Audio, display etc.

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SOC = System on a Chip

SBC = Single Board Computer

A SOC has multiple functional units on one piece of silicon. Often multiple processors and peripherals.

A SBC is a complete PC on a single PCB. CPU, RAM, non-volatile memory(HDD or flash)...

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