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(this is related to this other question )

If you define an Interface where there is a Property with only a getter (= ReadOnly in VB.NET), why can you define the setter in implementing classes with C# but not with VB ?

I would have thought it was defined at .NET level, and not language-specific.

Example : for this interface

'VB.NET
Interface SomeInterface

    'the interface only say that implementers must provide a value for reading
    ReadOnly Property PublicProperty As String

End Interface

or

//C# code
interface IPublicProperty
{
    string PublicProperty { get; }
}

This is a correct implementation in C# :

public class Implementer:IPublicProperty
    {
        private string _publicProperty;

        public string PublicProperty
        {
            get
            {
                return _publicProperty;
            }
            set
            {
                _publicProperty = value;
            }
        }
    }

But this is invalid in VB.NET

Public Property PublicProperty As String Implements SomeInterface.PublicProperty
    Get
        Return _myProperty
    End Get
    Set(ByVal value As String)
        _myProperty = value
    End Set
End Property
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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Be careful assuming that VB.NET and C# are the same language spoken with a different accent - they're not.

Because VB.NET requires implementation of an interface member to have that Implements clause, saying which member it is implementing. C# lets you implement interface members explicitly (SORT OF like VB.NET), or implicitly (no VB.NET equivalent). Therefore the actual C# version of this is

public class Implementer : IPublicProperty
{
    private string _publicProperty;

    string IPublicProperty.PublicProperty    // explicit implementation
    {
        get
        {
            return _publicProperty;
        }
        set
        {
            _publicProperty = value;
        }
    }
}

and this does gives an error:

error CS0550: 'ConsoleApplication171.Implementer.ConsoleApplication171.IPublicProperty.PublicProperty.set' adds an accessor not found in interface member 'ConsoleApplication171.IPublicProperty.PublicProperty'

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for this "aha" moment :) –  tsimbalar Jun 14 '11 at 9:22
1  
what really bugs me is that, in the end, a Property is just an accessor, and as far as I remember, the compiler ends up generating some kind of accessor methods in MSIL like "myProp_Set", "my_Prop_Get", so defining a setter would just result in "adding an extra method" in the implementer, which is not what I would call breaking the Interface ... but what I am saying here may be totally wrong ... I have a very limited knowledge of the process happening being the hood from "high-level" language to MSIL ... –  tsimbalar Jun 14 '11 at 9:26
    
@tsi I think you're right about that for VB - I'm hazy on the IL details of C#'s explicit interface implementation. From a language design point of view, generally the VB way is much more towards the prevention of any errors, even at the expense of flexibility. –  AakashM Jun 14 '11 at 15:33
1  
The explicit implementation of a property not defined in the interface should be a compiler error. Explicit implementations are "private menthods" that are hooked up to the interface. They cannot be called on the implementing class without casting to the interface. Thus the added accessor would be statically unreachable. Cannot call it from the interface because its not a member of the interface, and can't call it from the implementing class because it is private. –  John Melville Jan 12 '12 at 5:02

In .net, it is necessary that an implementation of a read-only property in an interface include a getter but no setter, and for the implementation of a read-write property to include both a getter and a setter. It is also necessary for the implementation of a write-only property (if one defines such a thing) to include a setter but no getter.

In C#, if a class defines a public property with the same name as a property in an interface, the public property implements the methods required by that interface, and the class does not explicitly implement the interface property, the compiler will automatically generate a property which uses the getter and/or setter of the public property, as appropriate. Even if a class implements three interfaces, one with a read-only property Foo, one with a write-only property Foo, and one with a read-write property Foo, a single public read-write property Foo can be used to implement the Foo property for all of them.

Conceptually, there's no reason vb.net couldn't offer a similar feature, and generate two (or even three) different properties as required to implement interfaces. At least at present, if a vb.net class member is marked as implementing an interface member, the expectation is that it will match the member perfectly without wrapping.

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