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I've been a developer for a long time, however forms have always been my least favourite part, more specifically designing them!

I'd really like to know how you do you forms, and why. I've had a few discussions with fellow developers over <div> vs <p> on form fields. Which one would you stick with, and why?

An example of what I am talking about:

<form action="" method="post">
    <p>
        <label for="username">Username:</label>
        <input type="text" name="username" id="username" />
    </p>

    <p>
        <label for="submit"></label>
        <input type="submit" name="submit" id="submit" value="Log In" />
    </p>
</form>

VS

<form action="" method="post">
    <div>
        <label for="username">Username:</label>
        <input type="text" name="username" id="username" />
    </div>

    <div>
        <label for="submit"></label>
        <input type="submit" name="submit" id="submit" value="Log In" />
    </div>
</form>

When it comes to styling, it seems you can do pretty much the same with both, so is it just personal preference, or is there logic behind using one over the other?

Thanks for your time :)

UPDATE I ended up following a nice article on HTML5 forms and have actually found it to allow MUCH better styling of forms. They are much more organised from a development perspective too. For anyone interested, it is located here: http://24ways.org/2009/have-a-field-day-with-html5-forms

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i think this is a very subjective matter and depends on the developer really. IMHO, i always use fieldsets -> uls and lis to contain each element. so one label and input/select/whatever in each li. while it does provide extra markup, it differentiates my form elements nicely –  corroded Jun 14 '11 at 9:08
    
    
I use lists... always seem to offer a decent way of styling both the form fields and container. –  Ben Everard Jun 14 '11 at 9:09
    
on a related note to wesley's comment, one of the answers there illustrate what i usually do: stackoverflow.com/questions/519234/… –  corroded Jun 14 '11 at 9:10
    
Updated my first post to link to this: 24ways.org/2009/have-a-field-day-with-html5-forms -- I found it to be very handy and have opted to use the html layout they used in the article. –  Rick Jan 5 '12 at 17:54
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7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

HTML is all about semantics. There is no reason username or submit should be inside a paragraph (<p>) because it's not a paragraph.

So I would go using <div> instead. Ok, maybe <div> has no meaning at all. But it's better than <p>.

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2  
+1, agreed. HTML5 will give us even better options, where you have access to even more tags (section, article, etc) to create a semantically adequate tag tree. –  Jeroen Jun 14 '11 at 9:11
    
To your edit: Fieldsets are for grouping related inputs, not wrapping every input or "row". Not sure why this was overlooked in the other user's suggestion. –  Wesley Murch Jun 14 '11 at 9:21
    
Makes sense I guess :) –  Rick Jun 14 '11 at 9:32
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I prefer the <div> variant, because its semantics is closer on what you want to express and markup.

A <p> tag is for text paragraphs, whereas a <div> is a general block of any kind.

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One option I'd like to suggest:

You could consider wrapping the input inside its label. That way you possibly can avoid additional elements. Also (if you don't need to support IE6) then this allows you to drop the for. And finally if the input is a check box or radio button, then it allows the user to click on the whole text instead of just the tiny control, just like in most operating systems:

<label>Username: <input type="text" name="username" /></label>

Also I'm not sure what the point of an empty label for the submit button is good for, except being lazy when writing the style sheet.

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This is a great solution, but unfortunately falls short when you want to have something like Name: First______ Last_______ - as the label may only be associated implicitly with one form control in this manner - and labels can't be nested. Otherwise I am very fond of this method, if for no other reason - not assigning tons of ids to form controls :) –  Wesley Murch Jun 14 '11 at 9:57
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Just thought I'd throw my 2 cents in (assuming we all agree that semantic markup is the goal):

While one can argue that form elements themselves are not semantic, this doesn't mean that the context in which they appear is not as well. There is no "one true way" to markup all form controls.

If the control is actually appearing in a paragraph of text, that is fine - but that pretty much never happens.

  • If it is an ordered list of checkboxes for example, put them in an <ol> tag.
  • If order is not relevant, use a <ul> in that case.
  • If it is a label/text_input pair, one could argue that a <dl> element is appropriate
  • If it is a spreadsheet, use a <table> (Yes, tables can be appropriate! In fact, I've heard the (questionable) argument many times that form data is tabular)

By the way it is considered a description list in HTML5 to clear up confusion about meaning, and whether or not it's appropriate for things other than literal definition terms.

Almost no one will ever say a <p> is appropriate, but very few will argue that a <div> is inappropriate because there are no attached semantics.

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What about fieldsets ? - it is more logical for forms

And in fact you can style anything the way you want

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Fieldsets do make the most sense, but out of habit I avoided them because of issues with old versions of IE. –  kinakuta Jun 14 '11 at 9:12
    
<fieldset> is for grouping related inputs, not wrapping every label/input pair. –  Wesley Murch Jun 14 '11 at 9:23
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Semantically I'd say divs make more sense simply because they have no semantic meaning and the only reason to use a block container like this is for layout purposes. That said, I use paragraphs, but completely out of habit. It's the only place I use paragraphs while not considering their semantic meaning.

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Semantically, each label is bound to its control through the for attribute. There's no need to wrap the pair for semantic reasons, although you may wish to do so for styling reasons. So div is appropriate.

Similarly, grouping of controls has a dedicated element fieldset so there's no sense in using ul, ol or dl for that purpose, and using them is simply a form of listitis.

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