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I have a string. How I can check if the string is a regular expression or contains regular expression or it is a normal string?

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1  
Example, if you please? –  Buhake Sindi Jun 14 '11 at 9:11
2  
Maybe there is regular expression to check if a string is a regular expression. Interesting question! But i doubt that there is way that covers all possibilities. –  Alp Jun 14 '11 at 9:11
    
is it impossible that a valid regex meant as normal string? –  oliholz Jun 14 '11 at 9:11
    
Also relevant: "Regex to validate regex" –  hoipolloi Jun 14 '11 at 9:16
    
I think the OP means, let's say he/she has String s = "my string with \[.\] and another [^b]."; How does he/she know that the string contains regular expression? Am I right or am I right? lol –  Buhake Sindi Jun 14 '11 at 9:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The only reliable check you could do is if the String is a syntactically correct regular expression:

boolean isRegex;
try {
  Pattern.compile(input);
  isRegex = true;
} catch (PatternSyntaxException e) {
  isRegex = false;
}

Note, however, that this will result in true even for strings like Hello World and I'm not a regex, because technically they are valid regular expressions.

The only cases where this will return false are strings that are not valid regular expressions, such as [unclosed character class or (unclosed group or +.

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1  
@hoipolloi: the "Java escapes" you talk about only exist in string literals. At the point where I have a String object they don't exist. So either I have a String representing ^\w+$ (possibly through a String literal that looks like this: "^\\w+$") or I have a compilation error (by writing a String literal that looks like this: "^\w+$"). But there's no String object that "has wrong Java escapes". It's simply not possible. –  Joachim Sauer Jun 14 '11 at 9:25
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@Saurabh Kumar: is this for a search? Or something else? We need some context. Is the user expected to enter a regex? Or is he expected to enter normal text? Is both allowed? –  Joachim Sauer Jun 14 '11 at 9:26
1  
@Saurabh: in that case there are two sane solutions: define whether the setting is a regex and stick to it (i.e. allow only a regex or allow only a non-regex) or provide an additional setting that toggles if the string is interpreted as a regex or not. Guessing won't help you here. –  Joachim Sauer Jun 14 '11 at 9:29
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@Saurabh Kumar, forget the mention of "java escapes" they are not going to help you at all, and were only mentioned in error –  Sam Holder Jun 14 '11 at 9:33
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@Saurabh: NO! There is no way to read the users mind! Is [^abc] a regex? Or is it a literal string because I want to search for that regex? –  Joachim Sauer Jun 14 '11 at 9:33

This is ugly but will detect simple regular expressions (with the caveat they must be designed for Java i.e. have the relevant back-slash character escaping).

public boolean isRegex(final String str) {
    try {
        java.util.regex.Pattern.compile(str);
        return true;
    } catch (java.util.regex.PatternSyntaxException e) {
        return false;
    }
}
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can i do something like filter all regex char from string and if the resulted string is equal to the original string the string is normal. –  Saurabh Kumar Jun 14 '11 at 9:18

there is no difference between a 'normal' sting and a regular expression. A regular expression is just a normal string which is used as a pattern to match occurrences of the pattern in another string.

As others have pointed out, it is possible that the string might not be a valid regular expression, but I think that is the only check you can do. If it is valid then there is no way to know if it is a regular expression or just a normal string because it will be a regular expression

It is just a normal string which is interpreted in a specific way by the regex engine.

for example "blah" is a regular expression which will only match the string "blah" where ever it occurs in another string.

When looked at this way, you can see that a regular expression does not need to contain any of the 'special characters' that do more advanced pattern matching, and it will only match the string in the pattern

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1  
Maybe he means a valid regular expression? –  Jeff Foster Jun 14 '11 at 9:12
    
@Jeff, maybe. if so hopefully he will edit the question to indicate that, and then I'll delete the answer, as it won't make much sense in that context. –  Sam Holder Jun 14 '11 at 9:16
    
can i do something like filter all regex char from string and if the resulted string is equal to the original string the string is normal. –  Saurabh Kumar Jun 14 '11 at 9:17
    
what do you mean 'regex char'? all chars are regex chars, but some have special meaning to the regex engine in certain situations in the pattern when the string is used as a regex pattern –  Sam Holder Jun 14 '11 at 9:22

Maybe you'd try to compile that regular expression using regexp package from Apache ( http://jakarta.apache.org/regexp/ ) and, if you get an exception then that's not a valid regexp so you'd say it's a normal string.

boolean validRE = true;
try {
    RE re = new RE(stringToCheck);
} catch (RESyntaxException e) {
    validRE = false;
}

Obviously, the user would have typed an invalid regexp and you'd be handling it as a normal string.

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can i do something like filter all regex char from string and if the resulted string is equal to the original string the string is normal. –  Saurabh Kumar Jun 14 '11 at 9:20
/**
 * If input string is a regex, matches will always return a false.
 */ 
public boolean isRegex(final String str) {   
    return str != null ? !str.matches(str) : false;
}
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1  
The string x is a valid regex that matches itself, so your code doesn't work correctly. –  svick Jul 14 '12 at 7:57

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