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Eclipse is offering final but I can't increase the i variable.

@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
    final TextView tv = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.tvSayac);

    int i = 1;
    do {
        try {
            new Thread(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    tv.post(new Runnable() {
                        public void run() {
                            tv.setText(Integer.toString(i));
                        }
                    });
                }
            });
            i++;
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    } while (i < 16);
}

enter image description here

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1  
It is not letting you do that since it would be racy. –  Dhaivat Pandya Jun 14 '11 at 10:03
    
When you call setText(), what are you expecting to get set - the real-time current value of i, or the value of i at the time the thread was created? –  Harry Lime Jun 14 '11 at 10:07
    
Also, why are you creating a Thread within a Thread and not even starting the outside one? –  Harry Lime Jun 14 '11 at 10:11
    
@downvoter: What is wrong with this question? –  Martijn Courteaux Jun 14 '11 at 10:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A final is an entity that can not be changed after it is initialized.

Final (Java)

What you could do is create a variable within the scope of the do/while loop that is final with the value of i and send that into the function.

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A final variable can only be initialized once not necessarily when you are defining it. It can be set any time within the constructor , but only once. In your case when you are incrementing i using i++, you are trying to assign the incremented value to i again which is not allowed.

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I think it is possible to create a local copy of the variable i. Try this:

@Override
public void onClick(View v) {
    final TextView tv = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.tvSayac);

    int i = 1;
    do {
        final int localCopy = i; // Create here a final copy of i
        try {
            new Thread(new Runnable() {

                public void run() {
                    tv.post(new Runnable() {
                        public void run() {
                            // use here the copy
                            tv.setText(Integer.toString(localCopy));
                        }
                    });
                }
            }).start(); // Don't forget to start the Thread!
            i++;
            Thread.sleep(1000);
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    } while (i < 16);
}

By creating a final local copy:

  • the compiler won't complain anymore
  • because of Java copies by value, you will only increase i and not localCopy.

I suppose you want to start the Thread as well...

EDIT: Indeed, you were right. You have to create the local final copy inside the loop. Check the new code.

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when I paste your code to eclipse, it generated same error on the line where localCopy is declared :( –  uzay95 Jun 14 '11 at 10:22
    
@downvoter: Some explanation? –  Martijn Courteaux Jun 14 '11 at 10:46
    
final int localCopy = i; // Create here a final copy of i this line is generating an error like i must be defined as final . –  uzay95 Jun 14 '11 at 10:55
    
@uzay95: Did you move the line, like I did? –  Martijn Courteaux Jun 14 '11 at 11:07

You could create a counter class like that and increment it. This way, the reference of the Counter object could be final but you could still set its value ?

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-1: This won't work. Because you are working with a reference to the myCounter variable, which changes. The result will be that all the composed String will be the same. Create a local copy of the counter in the counter class, and I will +1. –  Martijn Courteaux Jun 14 '11 at 10:15
    
Sorry but i dont get your point. Declaring an instance final doesnt make its fields final, so why would we have all the strings identicals? –  Sephy Jun 14 '11 at 10:21
    
You will have only one instance of the Counter class. You are using the reference to the instance inside the Thread body, which will be executed later. The loop creates a Thread and increases the counter. And when the Thread is finally running (when the loop is done), the counter will be 16 (break condition of the loop). –  Martijn Courteaux Jun 14 '11 at 10:26
    
Ok, thanks for the explanation! –  Sephy Jun 14 '11 at 10:50
1  
Check this pastebin. I wrote both, the way you suggest and the way I did: pastebin.com/0Stw5a1n –  Martijn Courteaux Jun 14 '11 at 11:09

The easiest solution here is to create a class:

public class FinalCounter {

    private int val;

    public FinalCounter(int intialVal) {
        val=intialVal;
    }
    public void increment(){
        val++;
    }
    public void decrement(){
        val--;
    }
    public int getVal(){
        return val;
    }

    public static void main(String[] arg){
        final FinalCounter test = new FinalCounter(0);
        test.increment(); // 1
        test.increment(); // 2
        test.increment(); // 3
        test.increment(); // 4
        test.increment(); // 5
        test.decrement(); // 4
        System.out.println(test.getVal());  // prints 4
    }
}
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