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My case :

    function C() {
            this.create = function() {
                    var div=document.createElement("div");
                    div.setAttribute("onclick","alert('this works')");
                    div.onclick=function(){
                            alert("this doesnt work");
                    }
                    document.appendChild(div);
            }
            this.create();
    }
    var x = new C();

Is it not possible to set onclick event that way in javascript ?? Should the function that is called should be globally defined ??? I can understand the problem that it is not globally defined. But I want to use the private variables within the function where I define the onclick event. Any suggestions ??????

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

What you've posted is almost correct. Append the element to anything but the document, e.g.: document.body. Don't set event handlers with setAttribute because it's buggy. You can use the onclick property or the W3C standard addEventListener method (attachEvent in IE).

function C() {
    this.create = function() {
        var div = document.createElement("div");
        div.innerHTML = "click me";
        var inner = "WORKS!";
        div.onclick = function(){
            alert(inner); // private variable is ok
        };
        document.body.appendChild(div);
        div = null; // avoid memory leak in IE
    };
    this.create();
}
var x = new C();
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What about

div.addEventListener('click', function() {
    alert('hello!');
}, false);

?

That way the function is anonymous and is only seen in the scope in which you're declaring it. It's not global.

Here's some API docs on addEventListener: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/element.addEventListener

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I believe that to be the same with div.onclick=function(){ alert("this doesnt work"); } though -- which uses an annonymous function too. –  Liv Jun 14 '11 at 11:03
    
Yes, but 'my' method allows you to add more than one listener. Assigning it with = just allows you to have one listener. –  sole Jun 14 '11 at 13:34

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