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for debugging I need to dump the contents of nested maps. I tried to describe this in the following code:

struct Foo
{       
   string name;
};

typedef std::map<string, Foo> MapFoo;

struct Bar  {
  string name;    
  MapFoo mapFoo;
};

typedef std::map<string, Bar> MapBar;

...

MapBar mapBar = init_mapBar(); 

const MapBar::const_iterator it = mapBar.find("name");

if ( mapBar.end() != it )
{
    return it->second;
}

Before I return it->second, I want to dump the contents of that item to cout. I am getting lost with the iterators when trying doing this. Thank you very much for some help or hints.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Write a function:

template <typename K, typename V, typename C>
void Dump( const map <K,V,C> & m ) {
    typename map <K,V,C>::const_iterator it = m.begin();
    while( it != m.end() ) {
        cout << it->first << " = " << it->second << endl;
        ++it;
    }
}

You can then say:

if ( mapBar.end() != it )
{
    Dump( it->second );
    return it->second;
}

and use it for dumping any other maps where K & V are types that have streaming operators available.

share|improve this answer
    
@Neil: I was under the impression that one would need to specific all the template parameters ? –  Matthieu M. Jun 14 '11 at 13:05
    
@Matthieu Sorry, I don't get you. I have now tested the code & fixed a couple of syntax errors. –  nbt Jun 14 '11 at 13:12
    
@Matthieu M. Not really, the types are deducible by the compiler from the argument to the function, so there is no problem there, no need to specify any of the arguments. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 14 '11 at 13:19
    
@David, @Neil: Ah, but if I specify a std::map<int,char,MyCmp> then it won't match this function because the compiler will expect std::less<int> as a comparator. Or am I mistaken ? –  Matthieu M. Jun 14 '11 at 13:40
    
@Matthieu Oh, I see - yes, good point. I've fixed it. –  nbt Jun 14 '11 at 13:47

you can use two separate. One for a map <string, int> and one for a map<string, map<string, int> >.

For Example, something like:
Note: I haven't tested the code.

map <string, map <string, int> > foo;
// fill map
map <string, map <string, int> >::iterator outerit;

map <string, int>::iterator innerit;

for (outerit = foo.begin(); outerit != foo.end(); ++outerit)
{
    for (innerit = outerit->second.begin(); innerit != outerit->second.end();++innerit)
    {
        cout << outerit->first << " " <<  innerit->first << " " << innerit->second << "\n";
        //Write contents to a file here
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can add this before the return statement

std::cout << "name: " << it->second.name << std::endl;
MapFoo::const_iterator it2;
for (it2 = it->second.mapFoo.begin(); it2 != it->second.mapFoo.end(); ++it2)
  std::cout << it2->second.name << std::endl
share|improve this answer

If you want to avoid any coding at all and just need a quick-and-cheap solution, you can use our magic container printer -- just include the header and bingo. (If you're not in C++0x, you may have to remove the tuple stuff and put a space between angled brackets.)

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I tend to prefer operator overloading. It works really well coupled with some "decorators".

First a range adapter, that we'll use for any container

template <typename It>
struct Range
{
  Range(It b, It e): begin(b), end(e) {}
  It begin; It end;
};

template <typename It>
Range<It> MakeRange(It b, It e) { return Range<It>(b,e); }

template <typename C>
Range<typename C::const_iterator> MakeRange(C const& c) {
  return Range<typename C::const_iterator>(c.cbegin(), c.cend());
}

template <typename Stream, typename It>
Stream& operator<<(Stream& out, Range<It> range) {
  if (range.begin == range.end) { return out; }

  out << *range.begin;
  for (++range.begin; range.begin != range.end; ++range.begin) {
    out << *range.begin;
  }
  return out;
}

Next a Decorator for pairs printing (either tuple-mode or dictionary mode):

template <typename Stream>
class StreamPairDict
{
public:
  StreamPairDict(Stream& b): base(b) {}

  template <typename T, typename U>
  StreamPairDict& append(std::pair<T,U> const& p) {
    base << p.first << ": " << p.second;
    return *this;
  }

  template <typename Other>
  StreamPairDict& append(Other const& o) {
    base << o; return *this;
  }

private:
  Stream& base;
};

template <typename S, typename T>
StreamPairDict<S>& operator<<(StreamPairDict<S>& stream, T const& t) {
  return s.append(t);
}

template <typename S, typename Stream>
StreamPairDict<S> MakeStreamPairDict(Stream& s) {
  return StreamPairDict<S>(s);
}

And finally, a general decorator, to trigger ADL without invading the std namespace:

template <typename S>
class Stream
{
public:
  typedef S Base;

  Stream(Base& b): base(b) {}

  template <typename T>
  Stream& append(T const& t) { base << t; return *this; }

private:
  Base& base;
};

template <typename S>
Stream<S>& operator<<(Stream<S>& s, bool b) { return s.append(b); }

template <typename S, typename Num>
typename std::enable_if< std::is_arithmetic<Num>::value, Stream<S>&>::type
operator<<(Stream<S>& s, Num n) { return s.append(n); }

template <typename S>
Stream<S>& operator<<(Stream<S>& s, char const* string) {
  return s.append(string);
}

template <typename S>
Stream<S>& operator<<(Stream<S>& s, std::string const& string) {
  return s.append(string);
}

/// many containers in the STL !!!
template <typename S, typename K, typename V, typename L, typename A>
Stream<S>& operator<<(Stream<S>& s, std::map<K,V,L,A> const& map) {
  return MakeStreamPairDict(s) << '{' << MakeRange(map) << '}';
}

template <typename S, typename K, typename V, typename L, typename A>
Stream<S>& operator<<(Stream<S>& s, std::multimap<K,V,L,A> const& map) {
  return MakeStreamPairDict(s) << '{' << MakeRange(map) << '}';
}

template <typename S, typename K, typename V, typename H, typename A>
Stream<S>& operator<<(Stream<S>& s, std::unordered_map<K,V,H,A> const& map) {
  return MakeStreamPairDict(s) << '{' << MakeRange(map) << '}';
}

template <typename S, typename K, typename V, typename H, typename A>
Stream<S>& operator<<(Stream<S>& s, std::unordered_multimap<K,V,H,A> const& map) {
  return MakeStreamPairDict(s) << '{' << MakeRange(map) << '}';
}

And it's used easily:

int main() {
  std::map<int, std::map<char, Custom> > myMap;
  Stream(std::cout) << myMap << '\n';
}

will work if there is a std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, Custom const&).

share|improve this answer
    
I take it you are not a believer in "the simplest thing that could possibly work?" :-) –  nbt Jun 14 '11 at 14:05
    
@Neil: I am, but I have so often needed to output a container (and there are many) that I have accreted a number of ad-hoc solutions over time... I think this one could work reasonably :) –  Matthieu M. Jun 14 '11 at 14:12

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