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 <select name="checkInDay" tabindex="3" onchange="calcDay();" class="ffe selectform" id="checkInDate">
    <?php for($i=1;$i<=31;$i++) {
        $value = $i < 10 ? "0".$i : $i;
     ?> 
     <option value="<?= $value ?>" <?php if($i == 12) {?> selected="selected" <?php } ?> > <?= $i ?> </option>
     <?php } ?>

  </select>

Thanks in advance.

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closed as off topic by Lightness Races in Orbit, Gordon, dolan, slugster, Nathan Fellman Jun 14 '11 at 12:51

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3  
In what direction do you want improvements ? Speed ? Readability ? –  dolan Jun 14 '11 at 12:34
6  
    
in readyabality first and then speed –  user160820 Jun 14 '11 at 12:37
    
Instead of making $value, I would output $i with printf('%02d', $i); –  binaryLV Jun 14 '11 at 12:38

3 Answers 3

Improved readability:

<select name="checkInDay" tabindex="3" onchange="calcDay();" class="ffe selectform" id="checkInDate">
    <?php
        for ($i = 1; $i <= 31; $i++) {
            printf('<option value="%1$02u"%2$s>%1$u</option>',
                   $i, $i == 12 ? ' selected="selected"' : null);
        }
    ?>
</select>

You should further improve your Javascript. Instead of using onchange="calcDay();", attach the Javascript handler programmatically using Javascript.

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This is how I would write it:

<select name='checkInDay' tabindex='3' onchange='calcDay();' class='ffe selectform' id='checkInDate'>
    <?php 
        for ( $date = 1; $date <= 31; ++$date ) {
            $selected = $date === 12 ? "selected='selected'" : '';
            $value = sprintf('%02d', $date);
            echo "<option value='{$value}' {$selected}>{$date}</option>";
        }
    ?>
</select>
share|improve this answer

The zero padding can be done using sprintf() rather than that messy ternary:

sprintf("%02d",$i);

Also, I'd suggest using a sensible variable name rather than $i... say $day, perhaps.

I'd move the 'selected' if() part out of the in-line code, because that's messy there.

$selected = ($day == 12?"selected='selected'":"");

I'd make the bit where it builds the <option> tag into a PHP string, rather than switching in and out of <?php tags.

Finally, you should change all <? into <?php because the short form has been deprecated. Your code should look more like this:

<?php
for($day=1;$day<=31;$day++) {
    $selected = ($day == 12?"selected='selected'":"");
    print "<option value='".sprintf("%02d",$day)."' {$selected}>{$day}</option>";
}
?>
share|improve this answer
    
I wouldn't use $month, when it describes $date ;) –  binaryLV Jun 14 '11 at 12:48
    
And <? is not deprecated. Though, it is suggested to avoid using short tags to improve portability. –  binaryLV Jun 14 '11 at 12:48
    
@binary - re $month/$date... heh. yeah. d'oh. trying to think too fast, me. Nevertheless, I think the point is made: single-letter variable names are a bad thing for code readability, even in a small tight loops like this one. –  Spudley Jun 14 '11 at 12:54
    
@binary - re <?: whether it's officially deprecated or not, I'd have to double-check, but the short form is disabled on a lot of PHP installations these days, so it's really not a good idea to be using it. –  Spudley Jun 14 '11 at 12:56

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