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How can I write a method to find whether a given string contains only a number? The method should return a Boolean value; true if the string contains a number and false otherwise.

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closed as not a real question by casperOne Jun 7 '12 at 13:09

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8 Answers 8

if(str.matches(".*\\d.*")){
   // contains a number
} else{
   // does not contain a number
}

Previous suggested solution, which does not work, but brought back because of @Eng.Fouad's request/suggestion.

Not working suggested solution

String strWithNumber = "This string has a 1 number";
String strWithoutNumber = "This string does not have a number";

System.out.println(strWithNumber.contains("\d"));
System.out.println(strWithoutNumber.contains("\d"));

Working solution

String strWithNumber = "This string has a 1 number";
if(strWithNumber.matches(".*\\d.*")){
    System.out.println("'"+strWithNumber+"' contains digit");
} else{
    System.out.println("'"+strWithNumber+"' does not contain a digit");
}

String strWithoutNumber = "This string does not have a number";
if(strWithoutNumber.matches(".*\\d.*")){
    System.out.println("'"+strWithoutNumber+"' contains digit");
} else{
    System.out.println("'"+strWithoutNumber+"' does not contain a digit");
}

Output

'This string has a 1 number' contains digit
'This string does not have a number' does not contain a digit
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1  
Why did you replace the previous solution with this? :\ You should keep the old one and append the new one –  Eng.Fouad Jun 14 '11 at 14:40
    
@Eng.Fouad: Because it doesn't work. This one will always work! This was my code if you still need to try it: strWithNumber.contains("\d"). –  Shef Jun 14 '11 at 14:42
1  
If you're trying to use regular expressions there it doesn't work (you would have to escape that backslash because \d is is not a valid escape character in Java). Even if you use \\d it will return false for both because String.contains() matches CharSequence and doesn't check for RegEx. –  alexcoco Jun 14 '11 at 14:44
    
@alexcoco: exactly why I removed it! –  Shef Jun 14 '11 at 14:47
    
See my answer for a RegEx solution. You can use \d instead of [0-9]. –  alexcoco Jun 14 '11 at 14:51

Perhaps I failed to understand your question, but it seems like you wanted to check if a particular string contained a number, not that it is a number.

public final boolean containsDigit(String s){  
    boolean containsDigit = false;

    if(s != null && !s.isEmpty()){
        for(char c : s.toCharArray()){
            if(containsDigit = Character.isDigit(c)){
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    return containsDigit;
}

References:

  1. String#toCharArray
  2. Character#isDigit
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This seems more elegant that using .matches(). I'd like to know which is faster though. matches() seems to create Pattern and Matcher objects on the bg, does that have a performance impact ? How is a regex compiled and compared against a string, that I'm not sure of. A test would be nice :) –  c00kiemon5ter Jun 14 '11 at 14:59
1  
my bets are, that this method would be faster, as it gets into the job right away. I have no idea how a pattern is matched and can't think of doing a match without brute-forcing the given string. So I'd say this is likely to be faster as it's more direct. Run @kaj's solution too, fun stuff :D –  c00kiemon5ter Jun 14 '11 at 15:35
    
@Ivan, I think that it is faster, I did some (very unreliable and unprofessional) tests and it looks like the character array is fastest and Scanner is the slowest. –  alexcoco Jun 14 '11 at 15:48
    
assigning a variable in the if statement is a bit unusual and causes a compiler warning in my IDE. You could remove the containsDigit flag and replace "break" with "return true". –  k2col Feb 24 at 4:38
    
@k2col, I prefer methods to have a single return statement. And as far as variable assigning within an if, I also consider that a personal preference. AFAIK, this method is completely safe. –  mre Feb 24 at 13:47

You could use a regex to find out if the String contains a number. Take a look at the matches() method.

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Looks like people like doing spoonfeeding, so I have decided to post the worst solution to an easy task:

public static boolean isNumber(String s) throws Exception {
    boolean result = false;
    byte[] bytes = s.getBytes("ASCII");
    int tmp, i = bytes.length;
    while (i >0  && (result = ((tmp = bytes[--i] - '0') >= 0) && tmp <= 9));
    return result;
}

About the worst code I could imagine, but there might be other people here who can come up with even worse solutions.

Hm, containsNumber is worse:

public static boolean containsNumber(String s) throws Exception {
    boolean result = false;
    byte[] bytes = s.getBytes("ASCII");
    int tmp, i = bytes.length;
    while (i >0  && (true | (result |= ((tmp = bytes[--i] - '0') >= 0) && tmp <= 9)));
    return result;
}
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Shef's answer doesn't compile for me. It looks like he's using RegEx in String.contains(). If you want to use RegEx use this:

String strWithNumber = "This string has a 1 number";
String strWithoutNumber = "This string has a number";

System.out.println(strWithNumber.matches(".*\\d.*"));
System.out.println(strWithoutNumber.matches(".*\\d.*"));
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Why don't you try to write a function based on Integer.parseInt(String obj) ? The function could accept as parameter your String object, and then tokenize the String and use Integer.parseInt(String obj) to extract the number from the "lucky" substring...

Javadoc of Integer.parseInt(String obj)

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This would be the quickest way, but it is not proper software engineering. I mean, one should check if the string is a number is a number doing operations ON the String, and not mapping the number retrieval through Exception firing. –  csparpa Jun 14 '11 at 14:18
    
Just the overhead of catching exceptions and handling them is silly. Exceptions are for exceptional cases, not for checking if Strings contain digits. –  alexcoco Jun 14 '11 at 14:57
    
That is exacyly what I said above.. –  csparpa Jun 14 '11 at 15:08
 try{
      Integer.parseInt(string);
      return true;
}catch (Exception  e){
      return false;
}

or you can do it himself:

 for ( int i = 0; i < string.length; ++i ) {
      if ( !( string[i] >= '0' || string[i] <= '9' ) )
           return false;
 }
 return true;

Of course is also function isDigit

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Another possible solution is to use a Scanner object like this:

Scanner scanner = new Scanner(inputString);  
if (scanner.hasNextInt()) {  
  return true;
}
else {
  return false
}

Of course, if you are looking for a double, use hasNextDouble() method (see: Scanner javadoc)

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1  
If Java.util provides us a pattern scanner like Scanner, why should not we use it??? –  csparpa Jun 14 '11 at 14:55

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