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Is it possible to have a child function which calls a parent abstract function of the same name? In other words, I want the parent's function to be abstract so that it forces every child class to implement it. However, I don't want to completely override the parent's function, I want to be able to call it within the child's. Something like this:

class Parent {
    abstract function doSomething() {
        $do = true;
    }
}

class Child extends Parent {
    function doSomething() {
        parent::doSomething(); // sets $do = true
        $also_do = true;
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Asbract methods cannot have a body

abstract function doSomething();

If you want it to have a body, you must not declare it abstract. If you want to force child classes to stricly override an existing method, then there is something wrong with your design, or you should introduce another method (e.g. abstract function doSomethingChildSpecific()).

However, its possible to call the overridden method the way you already do it.

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Okay. I had thought of having 2 functions (with the specific() one being abstract) but was just wondering if it was possible to have only one function. –  andrewtweber Jun 14 '11 at 14:53

As @KingCrunch mentioned, abstract functions do not contain a body, only a footprint. If you're interested in extending functionality, just re-use the method name, then use parent:: to call the base function's method:

class Foo
{
  function Test()
  {
    echo "Foo->Test();\r\n";
  }
}

class Bar extends Foo
{
  function Test()
  {
    parent::Test();
    echo "Bar->Test();\r\n";
  }
}

$foo = new Bar();
$foo->Test();

Output:

Foo->Test();
Bar->Test();
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And the ideone demo: ideone.com/qEvE6 –  Brad Christie Jun 14 '11 at 14:55

Seems to me, that you are thinking that, when a programmer declares a new virtual, overridable, method, its "abstract", and its not. "Abstract methods" do are new methods, but that doesn't have code.

May be you mean, by "abstract", that method in parent class, to do nothing, harmless, and still be called. It's a different thing, not an abstract class, but still a valid "pattern".

Sometimes, when coding classes hierarchies, I declare a brand new "abstract" method that doesn't have code, and must be redeclared in child classes, and sometimes, I declare a brand new method that has an empty block code, but, doesn't do anything, and still be called.

In classes, I also use a "DoNothing" method instead.

class Parent {
    function doNothing() {
        // does nothing, but don't remove me !!!
    }

    // im a new method, but, and Im abstract,
    // I must be overriden in child classes
    abstract function imVirtual();

    // im a new method, but, Im NOT abstract,
    // I don't need to be overriden, unless you want it
    function imAlsoVirtual() {
        deleteHardDriveWithoutAsking();
    }

    // im a new method, but, Im NOT abstract
    function imVirtualAndHarmless() {
        doNothing();
    }
} // class Parent

class Child extends Parent {
    // Im overriden from an abstract method
    function imVirtual() {
        $do = false;
    }

    // Im overriden from a non-abstract method
    // Im also extending previous method
    function imAlsoVirtual() {
        if (askUserFirst()) {
          parent::imAlsoVirtual();
        }
    }

    // im a new method, but, Im NOT abstract
    function imVirtualAndHarmless() {
        parent::imVirtualAndHarmless();
        sayHello();
    }

    // im a new method
    function imNewShinnyMethod() {
        sayGoodBye();
    }
} // class Child
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