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I'm echoing some text in a bash script with a variable in it, and want to pad that variable so it will always have the appropriate ammount of spaces to the right to keep the rest of the text aligned.

Here's an example of what I want:

Echoing random number 1080    [ OK ]
Echoing random number 443     [ OK ]
Echoing random number 34842   [ OK ]

The numerical value would be of varying length (probably no longer than 5 or 6 digits).

I know that printf can do this and right align the variable by doing the following:

printf "Echoing random number %5s   [ OK ]" $RAND_NUM

However, this would format the text like this:

Echoing random number  1080   [ OK ]
Echoing random number   443   [ OK ]
Echoing random number 34842   [ OK ]

And of course just echoing with spaces doens't work:

echo "Echoing random number ${RAND_NUM}   [ OK ]"

Produces this:

Echoing random number 1080   [ OK ]
Echoing random number 443   [ OK ]
Echoing random number 34842   [ OK ]

Is there a way to print the text like my first example?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Use - to left align a field.

printf "Echoing random number %-5s   [ OK ]" $RAND_NUM

Alternatively, if you're on a Red Hat Linux system there are predefined functions that will print out green OK and red FAILED prompts (the ones you see during bootup):

#!/bin/bash

. /etc/init.d/functions

echo -n "Frobbing widget:"
frob_widget && echo_success || echo_failure
echo
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Thank! That's perfect. –  PHLAK Jun 14 '11 at 15:41
    
Could you add links to definitions of these ok/failed functions in redhat? –  user35186 Jun 3 '14 at 9:41
1  
@user35186 See /lib/lsb/init-functions on your system, which is the modern cross-distro version of the script. If you have it, you can use log_success_msg, log_failure_msg, and log_warning_msg. –  John Kugelman Jun 3 '14 at 20:12

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