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Is there a way to get the current cpu load under Java without using the JNI?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Use the ManagementFactory to get an OperatingSystemMXBean and call getSystemLoadAverage() on it.

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Weird. The getSystemLoadAverage link doesn't go to the anchor, but when I went in to edit it, it did work. Maybe the system now auto-replaces () with %28%29, even in anchors. –  Michael Myers Mar 11 '09 at 14:28
    
Well, when I edited it, I got it wrong the first time. Maybe we had a human race condition. Having the link seemed to make the answer even more perfect, though. –  Bob Cross Mar 11 '09 at 14:35
    
What I meant was that the link still shows as #getSystemLoadAverage%28%29. The Runtime.exec() link in Bombe's answer below has the same issue, and editing it shows exec(java.lang.String) instead of exec%28java.lang.String%29. Do either of those work for anyone else? –  Michael Myers Mar 11 '09 at 14:50
    
I don't think I see what you see: I'm running Firefox on Fedora 9 and I see this for the getSystemLoadAverage() link: java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/management/… –  Bob Cross Mar 11 '09 at 14:54
1  
I am pretty sure this doesn't work on Windows XP. –  Peter Lawrey Mar 16 '09 at 7:04

This does involve JNI but there is a GPL library from Hyperic called Sigar that provides this information for all the major platforms, as well as a bunch of other OS-dependent stats like disk usage. It's worked great for us.

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On linux you could just read the file /proc/loadavg, where the first three values represent the load averages. For Windows you probably have to stick to JNI.

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getSystemLoadAverage() gives you value over 1 minute of time (refreshes every second) and gives this value for overall operating system. More realtime overview should be done by monitoring each thread separately. Important is also notice the monitoring refresh interval - more often you check the value, more precice it is in given moment and if you do it every millisecond, it is typically 0 or 100 (or more depending how many CPU's is there). But if we allow timeframe (for example 1 second), we get avarage over this period of time and we get more informative result. Also, it is important to notice, that it is highly unlikely, that only one thread occupies more than one CPU (core).

Following implementation allows to use 3 methods:

  • getTotalUsage() - Total load by all the threads in JVM
  • getAvarageUsagePerCPU() - Avarage load per CPU (core)
  • getUsageByThread(Thread t) - Total load by specified thread

    import java.lang.management.ManagementFactory;
    import java.lang.management.OperatingSystemMXBean;
    import java.lang.management.ThreadMXBean;
    import java.util.Collection;
    import java.util.HashMap;
    import java.util.HashSet;
    import java.util.Map;
    import java.util.Set;
    
    public class MonitoringThread extends Thread {
    
        private long refreshInterval;
        private boolean stopped;
    
        private Map<Long, ThreadTime> threadTimeMap = new HashMap<Long, ThreadTime>();
        private ThreadMXBean threadBean = ManagementFactory.getThreadMXBean();
        private OperatingSystemMXBean opBean = ManagementFactory.getOperatingSystemMXBean();
    
        public MonitoringThread(long refreshInterval) {
            this.refreshInterval = refreshInterval;
    
            setName("MonitoringThread");
    
            start();
        }
    
        @Override
        public void run() {
            while(!stopped) {
                Set<Long> mappedIds;
                synchronized (threadTimeMap) {
                    mappedIds = new HashSet<Long>(threadTimeMap.keySet());
                }
    
                long[] allThreadIds = threadBean.getAllThreadIds();
    
                removeDeadThreads(mappedIds, allThreadIds);
    
                mapNewThreads(allThreadIds);
    
                Collection<ThreadTime> values;
                synchronized (threadTimeMap) {
                    values = new HashSet<ThreadTime>(threadTimeMap.values());    
                }
    
                for (ThreadTime threadTime : values) {
                    synchronized (threadTime) {
                        threadTime.setCurrent(threadBean.getThreadCpuTime(threadTime.getId())); 
                    }
                }
    
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(refreshInterval);
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    throw new RuntimeException(e);
                }
    
                for (ThreadTime threadTime : values) {
                    synchronized (threadTime) {
                        threadTime.setLast(threadTime.getCurrent());    
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    
        private void mapNewThreads(long[] allThreadIds) {
            for (long id : allThreadIds) {
                synchronized (threadTimeMap) {
                    if(!threadTimeMap.containsKey(id))
                        threadTimeMap.put(id, new ThreadTime(id));
                }
            }
        }
    
        private void removeDeadThreads(Set<Long> mappedIds, long[] allThreadIds) {
            outer: for (long id1 : mappedIds) {
                for (long id2 : allThreadIds) {
                    if(id1 == id2)
                        continue outer;
                }
                synchronized (threadTimeMap) {
                    threadTimeMap.remove(id1);
                }
            }
        }
    
        public void stopMonitor() {
            this.stopped = true;
        }
    
        public double getTotalUsage() {
            Collection<ThreadTime> values;
            synchronized (threadTimeMap) {
                values = new HashSet<ThreadTime>(threadTimeMap.values());    
            }
    
            double usage = 0D;
            for (ThreadTime threadTime : values) {
                synchronized (threadTime) {
                    usage += (threadTime.getCurrent() - threadTime.getLast()) / (refreshInterval * 10000);
                }
            }
            return usage;
        }
    
        public double getAvarageUsagePerCPU() {
            return getTotalUsage() / opBean.getAvailableProcessors(); 
        }
    
        public double getUsageByThread(Thread t) {
            ThreadTime info;
            synchronized (threadTimeMap) {
                info = threadTimeMap.get(t.getId());
            }
    
            double usage = 0D;
            if(info != null) {
                synchronized (info) {
                    usage = (info.getCurrent() - info.getLast()) / (refreshInterval * 10000);
                }
            }
            return usage;
        }
    
        static class ThreadTime {
    
            private long id;
            private long last;
            private long current;
    
            public ThreadTime(long id) {
                this.id = id;
            }
    
            public long getId() {
                return id;
            }
    
            public long getLast() {
                return last;
            }
    
            public void setLast(long last) {
                this.last = last;
            }
    
            public long getCurrent() {
                return current;
            }
    
            public void setCurrent(long current) {
                this.current = current;
            }
        }
    }
    
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Under Linux you could use Runtime.exec() to execute “uptime” and evaluate the output. I don’t there’s a better way under Linux, and I don’t think there’s an equally “convenient” way under Windows.

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If you're using the JRockit JVM you could use JMAPI. It works for JDK 1.4, 1.5 and 1.6.

System.out.println("Total CPU-usage:" + JVMFactory.getJVM().getMachine().getCPULoad());

System.out.println("Total JVM-load :" + JVMFactory.getJVM().getJVMLoad());

for(Iterator it = JVMFactory.getJVM().getMachine().getCPUs().iterator(); it.hasNext();)
{
   CPU cpu = (CPU)it.next();
   System.out.println("CPU Description: " + cpu.getDescription());
   System.out.println("CPU Clock Frequency: " + cpu.getClockFrequency());
   System.out.println("CPU Load: " + cpu.getLoad());
   System.out.println();
}
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