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I would like to write a single SQL command to drop multiple columns from a single table in one ALTER TABLE statement.

From MSDN's ALTER TABLE documentation...

DROP { [CONSTRAINT] constraint_name | COLUMN column_name }

Specifies that constraint_name or column_name is removed from the table. DROP COLUMN is not allowed if the compatibility level is 65 or earlier. Multiple columns and constraints can be listed.

It says that mutliple columns can be listed in the the statement but the syntax doesn't show an optional comma or anything that would even hint at the syntax.

How should I write my SQL to drop multiple columns in one statement (if possible)?

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9 Answers

up vote 97 down vote accepted
alter table TableName
    drop column Column1, Column2

The syntax is

DROP { [ CONSTRAINT ] constraint_name | COLUMN column } [ ,...n ] 
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Now I feel silly, I tried this first but it failed and I assumed it was a syntax problem. I guess I need to read the error more carefully! I will accept as soon as it lets me... –  Jesse Webb Jun 14 '11 at 15:40
    
@Gweebz - I assume that the error that you had was related to column usage. Column could be used in a constraint, index or another calculated column. –  Alex Aza Jun 14 '11 at 15:43
    
Precisely; the second column I had was used in an Index. I dropped that Index and my DROP statement worked perfectly after that. –  Jesse Webb Jun 14 '11 at 15:55
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weird, it throws a syntax error... –  jeicam Jan 8 '13 at 13:57
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create table test (a int, b int , c int, d int);
alter table test drop column b, d;

Be aware that DROP COLUMN does not physically remove the data, and for fixed length types (int, numeric, float, datetime, uniqueidentifier etc) the space is consumed even for records added after the columns were dropped. To get rid of the wasted space do ALTER TABLE ... REBUILD.

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+1 for the note about table sizes and requiring a REBUILD. Can you provide a link to documentation as a reference? –  Jesse Webb Jun 14 '11 at 15:56
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Right there in the ALTER TABLE: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms190273.aspx –  Remus Rusanu Jun 14 '11 at 16:37
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I talked to my DBA about doing a REBUILD and he said that if the table had a clustered Index (which mine did), I could just run ALTER INDEX PK_IndexName ON TableName REBUILD and it would reclaim the space. This is somewhat described here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189858.aspx under the section "Rebuilding an Index". –  Jesse Webb Jun 14 '11 at 16:39
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Yes, your DBA is right. –  Remus Rusanu Jun 14 '11 at 16:51
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So summarizing

Oracle:

ALTER TABLE table_name DROP (column_name1, column_name2);

MS SQL:

ALTER TABLE table_name DROP COLUMN column_name1, column_name2

MySql:

ALTER TABLE table_name DROP column_name1, DROP column_name2;
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If it is just single column to delete the below syntax works

ALTER TABLE tablename DROP COLUMN column1;

For deleting multiple columns, using the DROP COLUMN doesnot work, the below syntax works

ALTER TABLE tablename DROP (column1, column2, column3......);

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This works in SQL*Plus. –  iamnotmaynard Jul 18 '13 at 14:54
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alter table tablename drop (column1, column2, column3......);
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This is incorrect syntax. Use: ALTER TABLE Test DROP COLUMN c1, c2; –  Graeme Jun 4 '13 at 19:23
    
This works in SQL*Plus. –  iamnotmaynard Jul 18 '13 at 14:55
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this query will alter the multiple column test it.

create table test(a int,B int,C int);

alter table test drop(a,B);
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This is incorrect syntax. Use: ALTER TABLE Test DROP COLUMN c1, c2; –  Graeme Jun 4 '13 at 19:29
    
This works in SQL*Plus. –  iamnotmaynard Jul 18 '13 at 14:54
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This may be late, but sharing it for the new users visiting this question. To drop multiple columns actual syntax is

alter table tablename drop column col1, drop column col2 , drop column col3 ....

So for every column you need to specify "drop column" in Mysql 5.0.45.

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This is incorrect syntax. Use: ALTER TABLE Test DROP COLUMN c1, c2; –  Graeme Jun 4 '13 at 19:22
    
@Graeme the syntax is correct, i have tested it and it works, if i use: ALTER TABLE Test DROP COLUMN c1, c2; Mysql throws an error. ...near c2 –  bikinurse Jul 4 '13 at 9:01
    
@TomBikiNurse The question has an MSDN reference hence it was assumed that the SQL in question is related to MS SQL Server and not MySQL –  Surya Pratap Jul 20 '13 at 7:01
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For MySQL (ver 5.6), you cannot do multiple column drop with one single drop-statement but rather multiple drop-statements:

mysql> alter table test2 drop column (c1,c2,c3);
ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near '(c1,c2,c3)' at line 1
mysql> alter table test2 drop column c1,c2,c3;
ERROR 1064 (42000): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'c2,c3' at line 1
mysql> alter table test2 drop column c1, drop column c2, drop c3;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.64 sec)
Records: 0  Duplicates: 0  Warnings: 0

mysql> 

BTW, drop <col_name> is shorthanded for drop column <col_name> as you can see from drop c3 above.

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alter table table_name add field_name data_type

alter table table_name drop column field_name

or

alter table table_name drop field_name

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This doesn't answer the question of how to drop multiple columns in one command. –  iamnotmaynard Jul 18 '13 at 14:48
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