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I have an angle in a frame (I draw it with two lines). I want to make it flexible to frame; I mean, when the user expands the frame angle also become expanded and vice versa. I tried a lot of examples but I could not solve it. Can someone help?

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.awt.geom.*;

public class LineDraw extends Frame {
    Line2D line1 = new Line2D.Double(200, 200, 100, 300);
    Stroke drawingStroke1 = new BasicStroke(3, BasicStroke.CAP_BUTT, BasicStroke.JOIN_BEVEL, 0,
            new float[] { 9 }, 0);
    Line2D line2 = new Line2D.Double(200, 200, 200, 300);

    public void paint(Graphics g) {
        Graphics2D graph = (Graphics2D) g;
        graph.setPaint(Color.red);
        graph.draw(line2);
        graph.setStroke(drawingStroke1);
        graph.setPaint(Color.green);
        graph.draw(line1);

    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Frame frame = new LineDraw();
        frame.addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() {
            public void windowClosing(WindowEvent we) {
                System.exit(0);
            }
        });
        frame.setSize(300, 250);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Please post your relevant code. – Mike Daniels Jun 14 '11 at 16:30
    
I changed the tags, since this has nothing to do with Eclipse. – Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 14 '11 at 18:09
1  
It looks like your lines should not be constant, but be constructed inside of paint() from the size of the Frame. – Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 14 '11 at 18:12
    
That's my thinking. You need to get the bounds of the frame in your paint() routine. And invalidate when a resize is detected. – Marvo Jun 14 '11 at 18:47
1  
You can use getSize() to retrieve the size of your frame. (By the way, better don't paint directly in the frame, but in some component you put into the frame. Then you don't have to deal with the margin and such stuff.) – Paŭlo Ebermann Jun 14 '11 at 20:17
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here it is done in Swing. Everything is done in the EDT, as is intended with Swing as it is not thread safe. It is double buffered. Why the JLabel/Icon combination? It's just the best way to do it, as far as I have discovered, and I'd struggle to give you a historical/technical explanation of why - that's just the way it seems to have been designed. The other approach is to get involved with BufferStrategy but that starts to get more complicated IMHO.

import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.awt.geom.*;

public class LineDrawSwing extends JLabel implements Icon {
    Line2D line1, line2;

    public LineDrawSwing() { this.setIcon(this); }

    Stroke drawingStroke1 = new BasicStroke(3, BasicStroke.CAP_BUTT, BasicStroke.JOIN_BEVEL, 0,
            new float[] { 9 }, 0);

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame();
        frame.addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() {
            public void windowClosing(WindowEvent we) {
                System.exit(0);
            }
        });
        frame.add(new LineDrawSwing());
        frame.validate();
        frame.setSize(300, 250);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    @Override
    public void paintIcon(Component c, Graphics g, int x, int y) {
        Dimension size = getSize();
        line1 = new Line2D.Double(size.width/2, size.height-10, 10, 10);
        line2 = new Line2D.Double(size.width/2, size.height-10, size.width-10, 10);
        Graphics2D graph = (Graphics2D) g;
        graph.setPaint(Color.red);
        graph.draw(line2);
        graph.setStroke(drawingStroke1);
        graph.setPaint(Color.green);
        graph.draw(line1);
    }

    @Override
    public int getIconHeight() {
        return getSize().height;
    }

    @Override
    public int getIconWidth() {
        return getSize().width;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If sticking with AWT, I would use a ComponentListener to track the size changes for the Frame and reset the line coordinates accordingly.

You may get away with creating/updating the lines in the Frame.paint() context, but that's just not a very clean implementation, with a lot of implied logic and assumptions and, therefore, probably some issues.

So here's the ComponentListener approach. I had to make a few assumptions about where you wanted your lines to get drawn from/to, as you were not clear on this. (If you can be clearer on this, I can update the example.)

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.awt.geom.*;

public class LineDraw extends Canvas implements ComponentListener {
    Line2D line1, line2;

    public LineDraw() {
        this.addComponentListener(this);
    }

    // set up lines every size update
    public void componentResized(ComponentEvent e) {
        Dimension size = getSize();
        line1 = new Line2D.Double(size.width/2, size.height-10, 10, 10);
        line2 = new Line2D.Double(size.width/2, size.height-10, size.width-10, 10);
    }

    // required to satisfy ComponentListener interface
    public void componentHidden(ComponentEvent e) { }
    public void componentMoved(ComponentEvent e) { }
    public void componentShown(ComponentEvent e) { }

    // paint, main both as before

    Stroke drawingStroke1 = new BasicStroke(3, BasicStroke.CAP_BUTT, BasicStroke.JOIN_BEVEL, 0,
            new float[] { 9 }, 0);

    public void paint(Graphics g) {
        Graphics2D graph = (Graphics2D) g;
        graph.setPaint(Color.red);
        graph.draw(line2);
        graph.setStroke(drawingStroke1);
        graph.setPaint(Color.green);
        graph.draw(line1);
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Frame frame = new Frame();
        frame.addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter() {
            public void windowClosing(WindowEvent we) {
                System.exit(0);
            }
        });
        frame.add(new LineDraw());
        frame.validate();
        frame.setSize(300, 250);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Updated it to reflect a good point made by @Paŭlo Ebermann about not painting to the Frame directly. The above code is tested / works. However it is not double buffered, but that's another matter altogether and depends on how you want to approach it. I will post another answer that uses Swing. – Charles Goodwin Jul 12 '11 at 14:21
    
Thanks Charles I fixed my problem with your code. – SunyGirl Jul 22 '11 at 19:32
    
@SunyGirl: click on the 'tick' then and accept the answer. ;-) – Charles Goodwin Jul 22 '11 at 19:35

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